Works of the Cavendish Society: Gmelin, Leopold. Hand-book of chemistry. 18 v. & index. 1848-72, Volume 2

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Page 158 - ... between the poles (not as yet magnetized by the electric current), so that the polarized ray should pass through its length; the glass acted as air, water, or any other indifferent substance would do; and if the eye-piece were previously turned into such a position that the polarized ray was extinguished, or rather the image produced by it rendered invisible, then the introduction of this glass made no alteration in that respect.
Page 425 - ... galvanometer shows the same deflection whether the circuit be closed by a metallic conductor or by a liquid — a further rise of intensity does not accelerate the decomposition.] Aqueous solution of iodide of potassium may be decomposed by a current of the smallest tension ; next in order of facility come fused chloride of silver, fused protochloride of tin, fused chloride of lead, fused iodide of lead, water containing hydrochloric acid, water containing sulphuric acid. That the chloride of...
Page 169 - I placed upon a plate of copper, blue, red, and orange coloured glasses, pieces of crown and flint glass, mica, and a square of tracing paper. These were allowed to remain in contact half an hour. The space occupied by the red glass was well marked, that covered by the orange was less distinct, but the blue glass left no impression ; the shapes of the flint and crown glass were well made out, and a remarkably strong impression where the crown...
Page 158 - Between the polarizing mirror and the eye-piece, two powerful electro-magnetic poles were arranged, being either the poles of a horse-shoe magnet, or the contrary poles of two cylinder magnets; they were separated from each other about two inches in the direction of the ray, and so placed that, if on the same side of the polarized ray, it might pass near them ; or if on the contrary sides, it might go between them, its direction being always parallel or nearly so to the magnetic lines of force.
Page 158 - ... electric current, and so causing the magnetic force to cease, the light instantly disappeared ; these phenomena could be renewed at pleasure, at any instant of time, and upon any occasion, showing ,a perfect dependence of cause and effect.
Page 504 - ... was so placed that the axial line of magnetic force should be, when exerted, oblique to both the length and the magne-crystallic axis of the crystal; and the consequence was, that, when the electric current circulated round the magnet, the crystal actually receded from the magnet under the influence of the force, which tended to place the magne-crystallic axis and the magnetic axis parallel. Employing a crystal or plate of bismuth, that body could be made to approach the magnetic pole under the...
Page 504 - ... its diamagnetic relations being in no way affected. If the crystal be broken up, or if it be fused and re-solidified, and the metal then subjected to the action of the magnet, the diamagnetic phenomena remain, but the magne-crystallic results disappear, because of the confused and opposing crystalline condition of the various parts. If an ingot of bismuth be broken up and fragmentary plates selected which are...
Page 505 - I cannot,' he says, at the end of his first paper on magne-crystallic action, ' conclude this series of researches without remarking how rapidly the knowledge of molecular forces grows upon us, and how strikingly every investigation tends to develop more and more their importance, and their extreme attraction as an object of study. A few years ago magnetism was to...
Page 277 - The first object was obtained by the successive action of two air-pumps; the first having a piston of one inch in diameter, by which the gas to be condensed was forced into the cylinder of the second pump, the diameter of whose piston was only half an inch. The tubes into which the air, thus further condensed, was made to pass, were of green bottle glass, from...
Page 92 - Mercuric iodide separates from solution, and likewise sublimes at a very gentle heat, in scarlet tables belonging to the dimetric system; but when sublimed at a higher temperature in sulphur-yellow, rhombic tables of the monoclinic system. The red crystals turn yellow when heated, and resume their red tint on cooling. The yellow crystals obtained by sublimation retain their colour when cooled ; but, on the slightest rubbing or stirring with a pointed instrument, the part which is touched turns scarlet,...

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