The goldfinch, or, New modern songster. Being a select collection of the most admired Scots and English songs, cantatas &c

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Contents

Thou rising sun whose gladsome rays
21
When first I beheld thee 1 vow and protest
24
Come hear me my boy hast a mind to live long
26
John Anderson my jo cum in as ze gae by
27
Twas at midsummers tide no matter the day
28
Who has eer been at Baldock must needs know
30
On Tays fair banks youve often said
31
M
34
If ever O Hymen I add to thy tribe
39
Come gies a fang the lady cries
42
am a bride and lively lass
45
In the dress of free masons sit garments for Jove
51
Twas in that season of the year
56
My name is Argyle you may think it strange
58
Come cheer up my lads tis to glory we steer
60
Oh how could I venture to love one like thee
61
Wert thou but mine ain thing
64
How happy a lovers life passes
65
Cease rude Boreas blustring railer
66
Maidens let your lovers languish
69
Coming home with my milk the young squire I met
74
O Nelly no longer thy Sandy now mourn
76
gently touchd her hand she gave
77
How dare you bold Strcphon presume thus to prate
80
Come jolly Bacchus god of wine
82
In city town and village my fancy oft hath rovd
84
have lost my love 8
85
There was a jolly beggar
86
Come come my good shepherds
88
My sheep I neglected I lost my sheep hook
89
Why heaves my fond bosom
90
The silver moons enamourd beams
93
Come Colin pride of rural swains
96
Ive seen the smiling of fortune beguiling
100
My love was once a bonny lad
101
When Jockey was blessd with your love and your
102
There lives a shepherd in the vale
103
Since wedlocks in vogue
108
In spite of love at length Ive sound
109
Wood and married and a J
112
When Jessy sinild her lovely look
116
The women all tell me Im false to my lass
120
Sure a lass in her bloom at the age of nineteen
123
Do you hear brother sportsman
146
was of a tender age I
152
Down top gallant fails stand by your lee braces
154
The echoing horn calls the sportsman abroad
155
Hopeless still in silent anguish
159
There livd a wife in our gate end
161
had a horse I had nae mair
166
Herfell pe Highland shentleman
171
While pensive on the lonely plain
172
Donalds a shentleman an evermore shall
173
When Britons sirst at Heavns command
179
In ancient times as songs rehearse
181
Sophia is bright as the morn
182
How pleasing glides our morn of youtJ 183
183
The smiling morn the breathing spring
188
My banks they are furnishd with bees
189
Wine wine in the morning
190
My Colin leaves fair London town
196
hae laid a herring in fat
199
What care I for your herrin in fat
200
How imperfect is expression
203
The tither morn
207
With a chearful old friend and a merry old song
209
Happys the love that meets return
214
In April when primroses paint the sweet plain
219
Her sheep had in clusters crept close to the grove
220
Since artists who sue for the trophies of fame
222
What beauties does Flora disclose
224
My Sandy is the sweetest swain
233
winna marry ony man but Sandy oer the lee
234
My bonny sailors won my mind
241
In the morn as I walkd thro the mead
246
Soft pleasing pains unknown before
250
My lasses do you Jockey ken the pride of Aber
252
While the bee flies from blossom to blossom and sips
258
My sweet pretty Mog youre as soft as a bog
263
When summer comes the swains on Tweed
264
If you can tell ye muses fay
265
When fairies dance late in the grove
271
In airy dreams soft fancy flies
273
Since glory calls I must away
274
My pride is to hold all mankind in my chain
275

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Page 105 - For ever, Fortune, wilt thou prove An unrelenting foe to Love, And when we meet a mutual heart Come in between, and bid us part ? Bid us sigh on from day to day, And wish and wish the soul away; Till youth and genial years are flown, And all the life of life is gone...
Page 5 - And I will make thee beds of roses And a thousand fragrant posies, A cap of flowers, and a kirtle Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle...
Page 17 - Gray came a-courtin' me. My father couldna work, and my mother couldna spin; I toil'd day and night, but their bread I couldna win; Auld Rob maintain'd them baith, and wi' tears in his e'e Said, 'Jennie, for their sakes, O, marry me!
Page 6 - If all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy love. But time drives flocks from field to fold, When rivers rage and rocks grow cold, And Philomel becometh dumb, The rest complains of cares to come. The flowers do fade, and wanton fields, To wayward winter reckoning yields, A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall.
Page 44 - Tullochgorum ? May choicest blessings still attend Each honest open-hearted friend, And calm and quiet be his end, And a' that's good watch o'er him ! May peace and plenty be his lot, Peace and plenty, peace and plenty, May peace and plenty be his lot, And dainties a great store o...
Page 190 - Are the groves and the valleys as gay, And the shepherds as gentle as ours ? The groves may perhaps be as fair, And the face of the valleys as fine ; The swains may in manners compare, But their love is not equal to mine.
Page 190 - I have found out a gift for my fair; I have found where the wood-pigeons breed; But let me that plunder forbear, She will say 'twas a barbarous deed...
Page 17 - My father urged me sair: my mother didna speak; But she look'd in my face till my heart was like to break: They gie'd him my hand, tho' my heart was in the sea; Sae auld Robin Gray he was gudeman to me. I hadna been a wife a week but only four, When mournfu...
Page 89 - I broke my sheep-hook, And all the gay haunts of my youth I forsook; No more for Amynta fresh garlands I wove; For ambition, I said, would soon cure me of love. Oh, what had my youth with ambition to do ? Why left I Amynta? Why broke I my vow?
Page 43 - Tullochgorum's my delight, It gars us a' in ane unite, And ony sumph that keeps up spite, In conscience I abhor him. Blithe and merry we'll be a', Blithe and merry, blithe and merry, Blithe and merry we'll be a' And mak a cheerfu' quorum. For blithe and merry we'll be a' As lang as we hae breath to draw, And dance, till we be like to fa', The Reel o

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