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IN EVERY NATION;
PARTICULARLY THE BRITISH AND IRISH;
From the Earliest Accounts of Time to the present Period.

REN

Their remarkable ACTIONS and SUFFERINGS,
Their VIRTUĖS, PARTŞand LEARNING,

ARE ACCURATELE DISPLAYED.
With a CATALOGUE of their LITERARY PRODUCTIONS.

A NEW EDITION, IN FIFTEEN VOLUMES,

GREATLY ENLARGED AND IMPROVED.

VOL. III.

LONDON:
Printed for G. G. and 1. ROBINSON, J. Johnson, J. NICHOLS, J. SEWELL,
H. L. GAPDNER, F. and C. RIVINGTON, W. OTRIDGE and Son,

G. Nicol, E. NEWBERY, Hookham and CARPENTER,
R. FAULDER, W. CHAPMAN and Son, J. DEIGHTON,
D. WALKER, T. ANDERSON, T. PAYNE, J. LOWNDES,
P. MACQUEEN, J. WALKER, T. EGERTON, T.

CADELL jun. and W. DAVIES, R. EDWARDS,
.. VERNOR and Hoop, J. NUNN, MURRAY

RI: HIGHLEY,T, N. LONGMAN, LEE

and Hurst, and J. White,

1798.

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NEW AND GENERAL

A

BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY.

D

DOYLE (RICHARD)[A]; diftinguished by the title of the great

carl of Corke, was the youngest son of Mr. Roger Boyle of Herefordihire, by Joan, daughter of obert Naylor of Canterbury, and born in the city of Canterbury 1566. He was instructed in grammar learning by a clergyman of Kent; and after having been a scholar in Bennet college, Cambridge, where he was remarkable for early rising, indefatigable study, and great temperance, became student in the Middle Temple [B]. He lost his father when he was but ten years old, and his mother at the expiration of other ten years ; and being unable to support himself in the prosecution of his studies, he entered into the service of fir Richard Manwood, chief baron of the exchequer, as one of his clerks : but perceiving that this employment would not raise a fortune, he resolved to travel, and landed at Dublin in June 1998, with fewer pounds in his pocket than he afterwards acquired thousands a-year[c]. He was then about 170-and-twenty, had a graceful person, and all the accomplishments for a young man to fucceed in a country which was a scene of so much action. Accordingly he made himself very

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useful to some of the principal persons employed in the government, by penning for them memorials, cases, and answers; and thereby acquired a perfect knowledge of the kingdom and the state of public affairs, of which he knew well how to avail himself (D). In 1595 he married at Limeric, Joan, the daughter and coheiress of William Ansley of Pulborough, in Sussex, efq. who had fallen in love with him. This lady died 1599, in labour of her first child (who was born a dead son) leaving her husband an estate of sool. a year in lands, which was the beginning of his fortunes. Some time after, fir Henry Wallop of Nares, sir Robert Gardiner, chief justice. of the king's bench, fir Robert Dillam, chief justice of the common pleas, and sir Richard Bingham, chief commissioner of Connaught, envious at certain purchases he had made in the province, represented to queen Elizabeth that he was in the pay of the king of Spain (who had at that time some thoughts of invading Ireland; by whom he . had been furnished with money to buy several large estates; and that he was strongly suspected to be a roman catholic in his heart, with many other malicious suggestions equally groundless. Mr. Boyle, having private notice of this, determined to come over to England to justify himself: but before he could take shipping, the general rebellion in Munster broke out; all his lands were wasted, so that. le had not one pevny of certain revenue left. In this distress he betook himself to his former chamber in the Middle Temple, intending to renew his studies in the law till the rebellion should be fupprefed. When the earl of Efiex was nominated lord-députy of Ireland, Mr. Boyle being recommended to him by Mr. Anthony Bacon, was received by his lordship very graciously; and fir Henry Wallop, treasurer of Ireland, knowing that Mr. Boyle had in his custody several papers which could detect his roguish manner of pailing his accounts, resolved utterly to depress him, and for that end renewed his former complaints against him to the queen. By her majesty's special directions, Mr. Boyle was suddenly taken up, and committed close prisoner to the Gatehouse: all his papers were seized and searched; and although nothing appeared to his prejudice, yet his confinement lafted till two months after his new patron the earl of Eflex was gone to Ireland. At length, with much difficulty, he obtained the favour of the queen to be present at his examination; and having fully answered whatever was alleged against him, he gave a short account of his own behaviour since he first fettled in Ireland, and concluded with laying open to the queen and her council the conduct of his chief enemy fir Henry Wallop. Upon which her majesty broke out

[D] Historical Reflections by R. Vowil, p. 191. Budgell's Memoirs of the Boyles, p. 4. True Remembrances.

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