Lives of the Queens of Scotland and English Princesses Connected with the Regal Succession of Great Britain, Volume 1

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Page 271 - THE glories of our birth and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate : Death lays his icy hands on kings ; Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.
Page 290 - On his bold visage middle age Had slightly pressed its signet sage, Yet had not quenched the open truth And fiery vehemence of youth ; Forward and frolic glee was there, The will to do, the soul to dare, The sparkling glance, soon blown to fire, Of hasty love or headlong ire.
Page 86 - By the time these words were spoken, even-song was nearly done. The King paused, studying to give him an answer. Meantime, before the King's eyes, and in presence of all the lords about him, " like the blink of the sunbeam or the whiff of the whirlwind, the man evanished away, and could no more be seen." " I heard," continues Lindsay of Pitscottie, " Sir David Lindsay and John Inglish, the marshal (who were at that time both of them young men, and special servants to the King's grace), thought to...
Page i - Lives of the Queens of Scotland, and English Princesses connected with the Regal Succession of Great Britain.
Page 13 - Margaret knelt and received the blessing of both her royal parents, most solemnly given. The Archhishop of Glasgow proceeded to read the words of the fiancelles, first to the Earl of Bothwell, and then to the Princess : — " I, Patrick, Earl of Bothwell, Procurator of the right high and mighty Prince James, by the grace of God King of Scotland, my sovereign lord, having sufficient power to contract matrimony per verba de presenti, with thee Margaret, daughter to the right excellent, &c., Prince...
Page 400 - Pack you, ye javellis; * get you to your charges, and reform your own lives, and be not instruments of discord...
Page 310 - ... (roaring) thereof; and also the riotous banqueting, delicate and costly clothings, triumphant plays and feasts, with pleasant sound of instruments of all kinds ; and also cunning carvers, having the art of necromancy, to cause things appear which were not, as, flying dragons in the air, shots of fire at other's heads, great rivers of waters running through the town, and ships fighting thereupon, as it had been in bullering streams of the sea, shooting of guns like cracks of thunder : and these...
Page 95 - The Queen convened such of the nobility as survived the red field of Flodden, to meet the clergy at Perth immediately. So prompt were all their proceedings, that the young King was crowned at Scone, near that city, within twenty days of his father's death. It was called the Mourning Coronation ; for the ancient crown of Scotland being held over on the baby-brow of the royal infant, most of the witnesses and assistants of the ceremony burst into an ' infectious passion' of sobs and tears. They wept...
Page 109 - My party-adversary," adds Queen Margaret, "continues in their malice, and proceeds in their Parliament, usurping the King's authority as I and my lords were of no reputation, reputing us as rebels.
Page 151 - Then comes her resolution to divorce her recreant spouse, and kindly favour her brother with her company in England for the time to come. Of that, Henry VIII. and Lord Dacre, if not Wolsey, had had already enough. However, she says—" And I am so minded (that, an I may by law of God, and to my honour,) to part with him, for I wit (know) well he loves me not, as he showeth to me daily...

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