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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE

FROM THE ROYAL INJUNCTIONS OF 1533

TO`TKE ACCESSION OF CHARLES THE FIRST.

Cambridge: PRINTED PT C. J. CLAY, W.A. AND SON,

AT THE ENIVERSITY PRESS.

TO

JOHN EDWIN SANDYS, ESQUIRE, M.A.

Public Orator in the University of Cambridge.

MY DEAR SANDYS,

The period devoted to the production of this volume has been coincident, for the most part, with your tenure of the office of Public Orator. During the last eight years it has, from time to tine, devolved upon you to recall to our recollection the achievements of not a few of our illustrious living, while it has been my endeavour to illustrate the careers of many of our memorable dead. I can scarcely venture to hope that my efforts will appear to have been attended with success in any degree comparable to your own ; but when I remember that I was, in the first instance, encouraged and aided in the prosecution of my task by one of your many distinguished predecessors,—the Orator of our undergraduaie days,—I feel that there is no one to whom I can more fitly dedicate the following pages tian to one who, while ably filling the same office, has constantly aided me with like sympathy and encouragement.

Bulieve me,

Very truly yours,

J. BASS MULLINGER

St John's COLLEOE,

3 Sept. 1884.

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The period comprised within the present volume, although somewhat less than a hundred years, can bardly but be regarded as the most important in Cambridge university history prior to the present century. It was the time when the code by which, with little modification, the university was governed for nearly three centuries, was, notwithstanding strenuous opposition, first introduced, and the ancient constitution of the academic community thereby almost subverted. It was the time of the foundation of four of the colleges, among them the most considerable of the entire number. And it was the time when those trammels were thrown over our higher national education from which it has but lately been set free.

While such was the internal history of the university, the influence which it exercised on the nation at large was not less notable,-far greater, indeed, than most writers on this period seem to be aware. In a former volume I have attempted to shew the extent to which the Reformation in England derived its inspiration from Cambridge; in the following pages it has been no small portion of my task to endeavour to shew the manner in which the great Puritan party was here formed and educated. In dealing with the carcer and influence of some of the chief leaders of that party,--Thornas Cartwright, Walter Travers, Whitaker, Laurence Chaderton, and Preston, I have sought to be

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