Page images
PDF

VII.

Seven hundred leagues, and threescore days

Since the last shore they left;
How sad becomes each mariner's gaze,

Of hope and joy bereft!
How dwelleth now in the heart of each
Madness that cannot be told by speech!

VIII.
“I have left behind me a gentle child,-

I have angered an aged mother,
And I from my home, in passion wild,

Have lured an only brother!”— “ Their curse be on him-yon dreamer dark,”— Thus thought the crew of the wandering bark.

IX. .
The sun went down on hearts more sad

Than twice in one life may be,
And when he arose he found them glad,

Though still they were on the sea;-
O human spirit!--glad look and word
Were all for the sake of a singing bird !

[ocr errors][merged small]
[merged small][ocr errors]

It sat all day on the mast and sails,

An omen right good to view,
For it told of land, and of dark green vales,

And it told the mariners true.
A prophet's promise—an angel's word —
They were all in the note of that singing bird !

PARSON'S BRIDGE.

BY THE REV. C. HOYLE.

Look on the abyss by time and ruin rent;
Look, and recoil not: steady be the brain,
Firm be the gripe and footstep of descent,
Precipitous, in peril to the chain
Of cliffs, where the rude plank and railing throw
Their frailness o'er the chasm, while foams amain
In eddying gulfs the torrent far below,
Black with the shadow of death! Gaze not on high
To scan the' impending height of mountain brow,
Lost in the cloud and storm ; nor let thine eye
Too-daring, meditate the downward gloom
Where horror and despair in ambush lie;
Lest fiends of frenzy hurl thee to thy doom,
And the wild rocks and waters be thy tomb.

AN INVITATION.

If she be not fair to me,
What care ( how fair she be.

SUCKLING.

WHEREFORE, Fanny, look so lovely,

In your anger, in your glee ?— Laughing, weeping, fair, capricious ! If you will look so delicious,

Prłythee, look at me!

II.
Wherefore, Fanny, sing so sweetly?

Like the bird upon the tree,
Hearts in dozens round you bringing ?
Syren ! if you must be singing,

Pr’ythee, sing to me!

III.

Wherefore, Fanny, dance so lightly,

Like the wave upon the sea ? Motion every charm enhancing,Fanny ! if you will be dancing,

Pr’ythee, dance with me!

IV.

Wherefore smile so like an angel,

Angel-like although you be ?Head and heart at once beguiling, Dearest! if you will be smiling,

Pr’ythee, smile on me!

V. Wherefore flirt, and aim your arrows

At each harmless fop you see? Coxcombs, hardly worth the hurting, Tyrant ! if you must be flirting,

Pr’ythee, flirt with me!

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »