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Deep in her unfrequented bower,
Sweet Philomela poured her strain;
The bird of eve approved her flower,

And answered thus the anxious swain.

Live unseen!
By moonlight shades, in valleys green,
Lovely flower, we'll live unseen.
Of our pleasures deem not lightly,
Laughing day may look more sprightly,
But I love the modest mien,
Still I love the modest mien

Ofgentleev'ning fair, and herstar-trained queen.

Didst thou, shepherd, never find,
Pleasure is of pensive kind?
Has thy cottage never known
That she loves to live alone?
Dost thou not at evening hour

Feel some soft and secret power,

Gliding o'er thy yielding mind,
Leave sweet serenity behind;
While all disarmed, the cares of day .
Steal through the falling gloom away?
Love to think thy lot was laid
In this undistinguished shade.
Far from the world's infectious view,
Thy little virtues safely blew.
Go, and in day's more dangerous hour,
Guard thy emblematic flower.

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FA B L E III.

THE LAUREL AND THE REED,

The Reed” that once the shepherd blew
On old CEPHISUs' hallowed side,
To SYLLA's cruel bow applied,

Its inoffensive master slew.

* The reeds on the banks of the Cephisus, of which the shepherds made their pipes, Sylla's soldiers used for arrows.

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Stay, bloody soldier, stay thy hand,
Nor take the shepherd's gentle breath:
Thy rage let innocence withstand;
Let music soothe the thirst of death.

He frowned—He bade the arrow fly—
The arrow smote the tuneful swain;

No more its tone his lip shall try,
Nor wake its vocal soul again.

- Cernisus, from his sedgy urn,
With woe beheld the sanguine deed:

He mourned, and, as they heard him mourn,
Assenting sighed each trembling Reed.

“Fair offspring of my waves, he cried;
“That bind my brows, my banks adorn,

“Pride of the plains, the rivers' pride,
“For music, peace, and beauty born!

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