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χειμάρρους 55.19
Xiaouo's (rhet.) 55. 22 n.
χιλίων δραχμών, fine, 53.1
χλανίς 36.45
χλήδος 55.22, 27
Χολλείδης 54.10
xonoluos, used absolutely, 54.44
χρόνους έμποιείν 36.2
XpGuevos, 'intimate with,' 55.23
χωρίον 55.12

V.
τα ψευδή 54. 32; μαρτυρείν, 45.2
ψευδοκλητεία 53.17 n. ; p. xlix
ψευδομαρτυριών δίκη, pp. Xxix, xlix

Ω.
wpa, not 'hour,' 54.4
üs (with acc. absolute) 54.31
ws, 'to the house of,' 54.10
έχoντo 54. 9

ENGLISH INDEX.
N.B. The first figure refers to the number of the Speech, the
second to the Section,
A.

Athenian clubs, pp. 213—216
About, quoted, 55. 16

Athenian places of lounge, 54.7
accusative, 46.18

Athens, demeanour in the
absolute, 54.31; 55.11

streets of, 45. 68; p. 213; p. lx
- cognate, 45.85

Attica, country-roads in, 55.16
- double, 53. 22

attraction, 45. 79; 53.22; 54. 12
- duration of time, 36.35 attraction of antecedent into
adverbs in -ei 36.8

case of relative, 53.11
Aeschines, p. xxxvii

audience, compliments to,
Alciphron, quoted, 45. 68, 70 36. 30; 54.9
anacoluthon, 36.2; 45.83
Andocides, 36.58

B.
Antiphon, 46.9; 54. 18

bankruptcy, 36.49, 50, 58
antithesis, 53.9

bimembered' construction, 45.
aorist, 53.9

34
Apollodorus, προς Τιμόθεον, 36. binary structure,' 55.13
20,53; 46.16

Blass, Dr F., p. xxxiv, xlii
- προς Πολυκλέα, 36.41, 45, 53 bribery, 46.26
- trierarchies, 36.41;

45.3;

by-standers in court, 54.41
53.5; p. lii
apology to audience, 45. 83;

c.
54. 15, 17, 39

Catullus, use of vester, 55.5
appeals ad misericordiam, 45.88; Cerdo, 53.19
53. 29; 54.43

change of subject, 36.3
apposition, 53.15; 54.13, 15 Chysoloras (Gk. Grammar),
arbitration, 45.17; 54.26; 55.
2, 32

Cicero, Phil. II. 54.24; 45.85
Aristides(rhetorician),54. 20,41; - pro Murena, 45.16
55.18, 24

citizens by adoption, 36.30
Aristotle, Politics, 46.7

citizens, rights of, 36.4 and 6
- Rhetoric,
46.10;

Cobet, quoted, 36.45; 45.7,11;
54.2, 9, 44

53,64; 54.20; p.211; 55. 4, 17
article, 54.7, 10

cock-fighting, 54.9
Athenian audience, sensitive. compound verb followed by sim.
ness of, 36.1

ple, 36.4; 53.4

p. 208

53.10;

exordium similar in several

speeches, 45.1; 54.2
expiatory sacrifices, 54.39

conditional sentences, 53.3, 23;

55.13
construction changed, 54.36

suspended, 53.29
copyists' errors, 54.39
court, sensational scenes in, 54.

38
curious collocation, 54.33

[blocks in formation]

D.
dativus incommodi, 55.10
dative, double, 54.16, 14; 55.8

of respect, 42.77
decuriare 46.26
Deinarchus, charges against De.

mosthenes, 54, 38; p. xxiv;

p. xxxviii; p. lix
demonstrative pronoun, redund-

ant, 46.9
Demosthenes Or. 37 (Pant.), 45.

77; p. xliii, xlvi
- (Or. 57) quoted by Stobaeus,

45.67
– alleged duplicity of, p. xxxviii,

xliv
depositions forged by copyists,

45.8, 19, 55, 60, 61; 46.21;

54.31
Dion of Syracuse, 36.53
Dionysius I. and Athens, 45.3
Dionysius Thrax, p. 209
Dobree's Adversaria, quoted, 36.

53; 45. 7, 13, 16, 18, 28, 48,
56, 58, 68, 83, 84; 46. 5, 9;
53. 1,8; 54.33, 40 bis; 55.6,
22, 29, 30,35

E.
Eleusis, floods at, 55.28
Eusebius, p. lix
ellipse, 36.7; 54.26; 55.21
emendations discussed, 53.12
emendations proposed, 36. 5,

53; 45.18, 19, 59, 73; 53.2;
54. 16, 40; p. 202 col. 2 and

p. 203 col. 2
emphasis, 54.30
epilogue, same in several speech-

es, 36.50; 54. 44
euphemism, 45. 3, 27, 75;

54. 25; 55.24
exhibitio (an exhibit), 53.14

H.
Harpocration, corrected, 55.5
Harpocration, quoted, 36. 25, 26,

31; 45.1, 15, 63, 64, 66,
70, 74, 80, 84; 46.7, 11, 20;
53.1, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 24 ;
54.1, 3, 26, 27, 34, 39; p.

213; 55. 18, 22; p. xlvi, li
harsh construction, 46.17
Hermann, quoted, 45.18
Hermogenes, 53.16; 54.1, 4
Hesychius, quoted, 36. 33 ; 45.

29, 30; 53.15; 54.11, 13, 20,
26,34; p. 214; p. 215; 55.

5,22
hiatus, 46.16; 54.6; p. xl
honesty the best policy, 36.52
humour, 55. 4, 13, 18; p. lxiv
Hyperides, p. xliii, lxiv

I.
imperfect combined with pre-
sent, 54.8
tentative, 53.7, 16

negative, double, (1) 36.22, 46 ;

(2) 45.14

repeated, 54.40
Nicias, 54.32
nobilis, 53.15

indicative with optative, 53.5
infinitive in relative clause,

36. 25; 45.10
- with two accusatives, 54.31;

55.12
innuendo, 36.42; 45.84
interest, 53. 13
interpolation, 54.33
Isocrates, 55.5; p. 214

- κατά Λοχίτου, 54.17, 18, 43
Trapeziticus, 36. 3, 5, 43; 54.

26
ita sim felix, 55.24

0.
oaths, 54. 40; 55.35
oaths taken by jurors, 36.26 ;

55.35
object-sentence, 55.22
olive-trees, varieties of, 53. 15
orchard, 53. 15
ordeal by fire, 54.40 n.

J.
Juvenal, 54.39

P.
participial clause, emphatic, 45.

72
participial construction, 54.1
participle, emphatic, 55.21

followed by subordinate par-
ticiples, 36. 25; 45.3
used for hypothetical clause,

45.13, 24; 53.25;
55.8
Pasicles, 36.8, 22 ; 45.84; p. xliii
Pasion, 36.3, 7,43; 45.35; p. xvii
passive of intransitive verbs,

54. 2, 5,40
periphrasis, 54.24
Phormio, character of, 36. 57-

59; 45.71-82; p. xix
Plato's Laws, 45. 79; 55. 11, 19;

K.
Kennedy, C. R. criticised, 36.35,

38, 57; 45,59, 62, 67, 73, 74;
46.26; 54.40; 55.22

L.
lawcourts closed, 45.4
Liddell and Scott, criticised, 36.

2,58; 45.76; 54.4; p. 212;
55.10

supplemented, 36. 43; 45. 84
loose construction, 46.13; 53.

20; 54.33
loudness of talk, 45.77; p. xxxvi
Lucian, 45.70; 54. Arg. 2; 54.

39
lunacy, 46. 14, 16
Lysias, p. xxvii, lix ; 54.9, 18;

p. 210, p. 214
Lysias de olea sacra, 53.15

36.28;

p. lxvi

M.
Milton, quoted, 45.33; 53.5
mixed construction 53.1
Mohocks, p. lx; p. 216
money-lenders, unpopularity of,

45. 70
mortgage, 53.10

plural, indefinite, 54.39
Plutarch, p. xxxviii, li, lix
Pollux, quoted, 45.58; 46.26 ;

53.15, 16; p. 214; 55.18
Polybius, passage explained, 45.

76
predicative article, 36.8
pregnant'expression, 46.11
present, historic, 53.5
Priscian, 55.8
pronoun, emphatic, 36.31; 45.

80; 53.22

N.
name, emphatic, 36.53
names, similar in the same

family, 55.3

Q.
questions, direct and indirect,

36.81

p. 210

R.

Suidas, mistake of, 55.18
Reiske corrected, 54.25, 27; 55.

synonymous verbs combined,
10

45.1
relationship, obligations of, 45.

T.
53
relative, double, 53.3

Theodosius (grammarian), p. 209
with sentence for antecedent,

Theophrastus, quoted, 45.08, 7:)
54. 26; 55.22

Theoric fund, p. xlv
repetitions of same word at

Thucydides, 55.5
short intervals, 45.4; 46.2,

Tiberius (rhetorician), 36.52
23, 28; 53.23

Timotheus (general), 36. 20, 53

tombs, 55. 13, 15
revenge, 53.1
rhetorical artifices, 36.2; 45.5;

- extravagant outlay on, 45.79
53. 4, 27; 54.9

torture, 53,22; 54.27
- evasions, 45. 34, 36

not applied in court, 45.16
exaggeration, 45.3)

trespass, 55.11
rights of water, p. lxv, 55.19

V.
road-making, 55.16
Ruskin, quoted, 53.5, 16

various readings discussed, 51.

39; 55.6,7
S.

Veitch's Greek Verbs, corrected,
Sauppe, 54.40
Schaefer, Arnold, quoted, p. xl;

verses in prose, 36.44; 54. 37
36.53; 46.17, 20; 54.3 etc.

vester and tuus, 55.5
Seager, Rev. J., quoted, 36.53 ;

vine trained, 53. 15
53.28; 55.7,35
sense-construction, 45, 27, 64.
sentences recast for clearness of walking, Athenian notions on,
translation, 53. 15;

54. 13;

45.68, 69; 63.67
55. 11, 12

water, rights of, p. lxv, 55.19
servitus, 55.19

Westermann quoted, 54.19, 20,
Sheridan, quoted, 54. 25

30, 31; see also depositions
Shilleto, Rev. R., quoted, 36.53 ; forged by copyists'
45.4, 27, 41, 63, 83

widows, marriage to guardians,
slaves, 45.74, 80, 81

36.8
names of, 45.86; and 53. wills, 36.7; 46.14, 24, 28
19, 20

phraseology of, 54.25
statute of limitations, 56.26 witnesses to wills ignorant of
Stobaeus, corrected, 45.67

their contents, 45.23; 46.2
subject of subordinate made. Wolf, Jerome, quoted, 53.14

object of principal sentence, writing-materials, 46.11

55.22
substantive thrown into verb,

z.
45.27, 68; 55.32

Zosimus, p. xxxix

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CAMBIILGE: PRINTED EY C. J. CLAY, M.A. AT THE UNIVERSITY Palss.

SELECT PRIVATE ORATIONS OF DEMO.

STHENES. PART I. containing Contra Phormionem,
Lacritum, Pantaenetum, Boeotum de Nomine, Boeotum de
Dote, Dionysodorum. With Introductions and English
Notes, by F. A. PALEY, M.A., Editor of Aeschylus, etc., and
Supplementary Notes by J. E. SANDYS, M.A. Fellow and
Tutor of St John's College, Cambridge. Crown Octavo,
cloth. 6s.

“The fame of Mr Paley as one of the best practical Grecians of this age would alone be sufficient to secure attention for this book among the Head Masters of our Public Schools and the Tutors of our Colleges...... It contains, in the small compass of 240 pages, six of the speeches of the great Athenian orator, which are less commonly read than his 'Philippics' and the 'De Coronâ,' because they rank among his 'private orations.' And yet, equally with the greater speeches of the same orator, they will be found to illustrate not only the details of finance, loans, interest, banking, and other mercantile transactions in Greece in the time of Philip, but also the laws and general polity of that Athenian State, which was the model of the ancient world... We gather from the Preface that the task of illustrating these speeches from external sources, such as Boeckh's work on 'The Public Economy of Athens' and from other German books, has fallen upon Mr Sandys. We may add that the introductions pre. fixed to the Speeches, and also the English foot-notes, leave very little to be desired by the student in the interpretation of the author's meaning."

The Times, October 17, 1874.

“Mr Paley's scholarship is sound and accurate, his experience of editing wide, and if he is content to devote his learning and abilities to the production of such manuals as these, they will be received with gratitude throughout the higher schools of the country. Mr Sandys is deeply read in the German literature which bears upon his author, and the elucidation of matters of daily life, in the delineation of which Demosthenes is so rich, obtains full justice at his hands......... We hope that this edition inay lead the way to a more general study of these speeches in schools than has hitherto been possible........ The index is extremely complete, and of great service to learners."

The Academy, Feb. 20, 1875.

As might be expected, these speeches abound in difficulties. There are the technical phrases of Athenian law, and there is the difficulty arising out of the circumstance that we have only one side of the case. This naturally makes some of the speeches obscure. It is a good test, both of a man's scholarship and also of his acuteness, to put before him a passage taken from any one of them. Every Cambridge man who aspires to classical honours takes care to make their partial acquaintance. A really good scholar who had omitted to do this, would come to as much grief when confronted with such a passage, as he would were he to be plunged into an ode of Pindar which he had never seen. If he thinks of the classical tripos, he will be sure to be told that he must master at least a few of these Private Speeches........ For the

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