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The National Temperance Society and Publication House,

58 READE STREET.

1881.

COPYRIGHT, 1881,

BY

J. N. STEARNS, PUBLISHING AGENT.

H. J. HEWITT, Printer, 27 Rose Street, New York.

HV 5258 M69

A CALM VIEW

OF THE

TEMPERANCE QUESTION.

BY CHANCELLOR CROSBY, OF NEW YORK.

An Address delivered in Tremont Temple, Jan. 10, 1881,

in the Boston Monday Lecture Course.

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HE object of temperance societies is to prevent drunk

The cardinal principle in these societies is total abstinence from all that can intoxicate. That total abstinence, if adopted by all, will prevent drunkenness no one will dispute. The object of temperance societies would be gained.

But two questions arise after contemplating these propositions: first, will this plan of total abstinence be adopted ? and, secondly, ought it to be adopted? The first question is prudential, the second is moral.

THE PRUDENTIAL QUESTION. 1. Will the plan of total abstinence from all that intoxicates be received by men in general? We desire to use in all measures of reform a plan that is practicable. We cannot be satisfied with mere testimony to a theory that will be unproductive of results. Herein reform differs from religion. Religion demands adhesion to a truth stamped by the conscience, even though that truth find no other adherent. But reform lies in the domain of the expedient. It seeks to make society better, and if it cannot raise society to the highest level it will raise it as high as it can. It will not prefer to let society wallow be

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