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Now matters it a pebble-stone,

Whether he shines at six or seven ? If they do n't leave the sun alone,

At last they'll plague him out of Heaven ! Never sigh when you can sing, But laugh, like me, at every thing!

III.

Another spins from out his brains

Fine cobwebs, to amuse his neighbours, And gets, for all his toils and pains,

Reviewed, and laughed at for his labours : Fame is his star! and fame is sweet ;

And praise is pleasanter than honey,
I write at just so much a sheet,

And Messrs. Longman pay the money!
Never sigh when you can sing,
But laugh, like me, at every thing !

IV.

My brother gave his heart away

To Mercandotti, when he met her, She married Mr. Ball one day

He's gone to Sweden to forget her! I had a charmer, too—and sighed,

And raved all day and night about her ;
She caught a cold, Poor thing! and died,

And I-am just as fat without her!
Never sigh when you can sing,
But laugh, like me, at every thing!

V.
For tears are vastly pretty things,

But make one very thin and taper ;
And sighs are music's sweetest strings,

But sound most beautiful-on paper ! “ Thought” is the Sage's brightest star,

Her gems alone are worth his finding ; But as I'm not particular,

Please God! I'll keep on “ never-minding.” Never sigh when you can sing, But laugh, like me, at every thing !

in." VI. Oh! in this troubled world of ours,

A laughter-mine 's a glorious treasure ; And separating thorns from flowers,

Is half a pain and half a pleasure : And why be grave instead of gay?

Why feel a-thirst while folks are quaffing ?-Oh! trust me, whatsoe'er they say,

There's nothing half so good as laughing!
Never sigh when you can sing,
But laugh, like me, at every thing !

0. LINES

SUGGESTED BY THE SIGHT OF A BEAUTIFUL STATUE

OF A DEAD CHILD.

1.

I saw thee in thy beauty! bright phantom of the past;
I saw thee for a moment-'t was the first time and the

last; And though years since then have glided by of mingled

bliss and care, I never have forgotten thee, thou fairest of the fair !

II.

I saw thee in thy beauty! thou wert graceful as the

fawn, When, in very wantonness of glee, it sports upon the

lawn; I saw thee seek the mirror, and when it met thy sight, The very air was musical with thy burst of wild delight!

III. I saw thee in thy beauty! with thy sister by thy side — She a lily of the valley, thou a rose in all its pride! I looked upon thy mother, there was triumph in her eyes, And I trembled for her happiness, for grief had made me

wise!

IV.

I saw thee in thy beauty! with one hand among her

curls, The other, with no gentle grasp, had seized a string of

pearls ; She felt the pretty trespass, and she chid thee though

she smiled, And I knew not which was lovelier, the mother or the

child.

I saw thee in thy beauty! and a tear came to mine eye, As I pressed thy rosy cheek to mine, and thought even

thou could'st die! Thy home was like a summer bower, by thy joyous

presence made, But I only saw the sunshine, and I felt alone the shade !

VI.

I SEE THEE in thy beauty! for there thou seem'st to lie
In slumber resting peacefully; but, oh! the change of

eye,That still, serenity of brow,- those lips that breathe no

more, Proclaim thee but a mockery fair of what thou wert of yore. vir. I see thee in thy beauty! with thy waving hair at rest, And thy busy little fingers folded lightly on thy breast : But thy merry dance is over, and thy little race is run, And the mirror that reflected two, can now give back

but one.

VIII.

I see thee in thy beauty! with thy mother by thy side, But her loveliness is faded, and quelled her glance of

pride; The smile is absent from her lip, and absent are the

pearls, And a cap, almost of widowhood, conceals her envied

curls.

IX.

I see thee in thy beauty! as I saw thee on that day,
But the mirth that gladdened then thy home, fed with

thy life away. I see thee lying motionless upon the’ accustomed floor, But my heart hath blinded both mine eyes — and I can see no more!

2. M. W.

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