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" Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death. "
CHAUCER A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL MANUAL - Page 500
by ELEANOR PRESCOTT HAMMOND, PH. D - 1908
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Zoological recreations

William John Broderip - Animals - 1847 - 380 pages
...TERRESTRIAL DRAGONS. " Through many a dark and dreary vale They passed, and many a region dolorous, Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death." • PARADISE LOST. IF, with the eyes of the imagination aided by the lights afforded by the strata and the ancient inhabitants...
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The History of the Struggle for Parliamentary Government in England, Volume 1

Andrew Bisset - Constitutional history - 1877
...and dreary vale They passed, and many a region dolorous — O'er many a frozen, many a fiery Alp — Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death." Paradise Lost, b. ii. vv. 6iS-6zo. other damage than the breaking my sword, my watch, and my snuff-box. On New Year's...
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Outcast Essays and Verse Translations

Shadworth Hollway Hodgson - English literature - 1881 - 413 pages
...564. We have a line of six half-stresses and twoemphatic ones, in the famous line of monosyllables, " Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death." Paradise Lost, II. 621. The six half-stresses are on the six first words ; thetwo emphatic ones on shades and death. Again,...
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Chaucer: A Bibliographical Manual

Eleanor Prescott Hammond - 1908 - 579 pages
...Prologue (1882) print weep, the eight MSS reproduced for the Chaucer Society all read wepte (wepped). Saintsbury, Hist. Eng. Prosody, I : 174-5 and note,...Chaucer, And for to drinken strong wyn, reed as blood Prol.63S Here the first three syllables are light, and four heavy monosyllables are grouped together...
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Chaucer: A Bibliographical Manual

Eleanor Prescott Hammond - 1908 - 579 pages
...Prologue (1882) print weep, the eight MSS reproduced for the Chaucer Society all read wepte (wepped). Saintsbury, Hist. Eng. Prosody, I : 174-5 and note,...another. Thus, from Chaucer, And for to drinken strong wyn.'reed as blood Prol. 635 Here the first three syllables are light, and four heavy monosyllables...
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The Elements of English Versification

James Wilson Bright, Raymond Durbin Miller - English language - 1910 - 166 pages
...alternate stresses demanded by measured rhythm seemingly become more natural, as in the line, / / / / / Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death. Paradise Lost II, 621 Sometimes the thesis consists of a significant modifier• that may equal or even exceed in importance...
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The Principles of English Versification

Paull Franklin Baum - English language - 1922 - 215 pages
...be compressed to the value of a theoretically unstressed element. Thus Milton's well-known line — Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death. Paradise Lost, II, 621. ' might if it stood by itself equally well be taken as an 8-stress or as a 5-stress line; and obviously...
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Scott, Chaucer, and Medieval Romance: A Study in Sir Walter Scott's ...

Jerome Mitchell - Literary Criticism - 1987 - 268 pages
...the Isles. Compare these lines: Scott: Black waves, bare crags, and banks of stone. [IH.xiv] Milton: Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death. [Paradise Lost, II, 621] Scott: Hurl'd headlong in some night of fear. [III.xv] Milton: Hurled headlong flaming from the ethereal...
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Meter in English: A Critical Engagement

David Baker - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 368 pages
..."spondees" appear regularly in iambic verse in English, none better as an example than Milton's famous "Rocks, Caves, Lakes, Fens, Bogs, Dens, and shades of death" (Paradise Lost 2.621). What we call them does little to help us understand the underlying metrical principles at work....
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A Poetics Handbook: Verbal Art in the European Tradition

Daniel Mario Abondolo - Social Science - 2001 - 301 pages
...chasteyn, lynde, laurer,/ mapul, thorn, bech, hasel, ew, whippletree — {The Knight's Tale 2291-3) and Milton's Rocks, Caves, Lakes, Fens, Bogs, Dens, and shades of death (Paradise Lost 2.621); these and others like them exhibit the interplay of a trope of contiguity with the tension...
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