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The reader will perceive that I have endeavoured to confine myself to a resumé of the more prominent incipient symptoms of the various forms of cerebral and mental disorder. I could not enter more minutely into an investigation of these subjects without trenching upon matériel which will constitute the bases of two succeeding works: viz., one on Organic Affections of the Brain, and the second on Disorders of the Intelligence, Cerebro-Psychical in their nature.

In justice to the reader as well as to myself, I make this explanation, as an apology for the somewhat cursory manner in which I have been obliged to treat the more practical portions of my subject. I refer particularly to those sections of the treatise that relate to the medical treatment of incipient paralysis, apoplexy, softening, as well as other forms of organic cerebral disease and functional mental disorder.

It was impossible for me, without greatly enlarging this already too bulky volume, to enter, except in general terms, upon the consideration of the subject of therapeutics. If I had attempted to do otherwise, it would have been necessary for me to have excluded from the work much salient, illustrative, and relevant matter having a direct bearing upon the class of morbid phenomena under analytical investigation.

vi

PREFACE.

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The reader will perceive that I have endea-
voured to confine myself to a resumé of the
more prominent incipient symptoms of the
various forms of cerebral and mental disorder.
(could not enter more minutely into an in-
estigation of these subjects without trenching
pon matériel which will constitute the bases
f two succeeding works: viz., one on Organic
ffections of the Brain, and the second on
isorders of the Intelligence, Cerebro-Psychical
their nature.
In justice to the reader as well as to myself

,
nake this explanation, as an apology for the
mewhat cursory manner in which I have been
iged to treat the more practical portions of
subject. I refer particularly to those sec-
is of the treatise that relate to the medical
atment of incipient paralysis, apoplexy,
ening, as well as other forms of organic
bral disease and functional mental disorder.

was impossible for me, without greatly en-
ng this already too bulky volume, to enter,
ot in general terms, upon the consideration
e subject of therapeutics. If I had at-
ted to do otherwise, it would have been
sary for me to have excluded from the
much salient, illustrative, and relevant

having a direct bearing upon the class
bid phenomena under analytical investi-

I am bound to confess that I fully and sensitively appreciate the many shortcomings and defects to be found in the following pages. It is not my duty, however, to point them out to the reader. His critical

eye

will no doubt soon detect all sins of omission and commission, and will, considering the vast extent of ground over which I have had to travel, make every allowance for them.

I sincerely trust that I shall not be exposing myself to the imputation of egotism, if I were to repeat what Goldsmith said in his preface to the “ Vicar of Wakefield,” There are an hundred faults in this thing, and an hundred things might be said to prove them beauties. But it is needless. A book

A book may be amusing with numerous errors, or it may be dull without a single absurdity.”

23, CAVENDISH SQUARE, LONDON,

April, 1860.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTION.
Important aphorisms of Hippocrates in reference to the early treatment of disease-

Marshall Hall on the neglect of premonitory symptoms of disease of the brain-
General neglect of incipient cerebral symptoms-Attention paid to the early
symptoms of disease in other organs-Cases illustrating the neglect of incipient
symptoms—Insidious character of disease of the brain-Obscure cerebral symp-
toms—All affections of the brain have an incipient stage-Latent disease of the
brain-Diseases of the brain subject to general pathological laws-Neglected
affections of the brain-Cases of alterations of structure of the brain-Physiology
of the brain-Necessity of watching for incipient cerebral disease-Early treat-
ment of insanity-Unwillingness to recognise the existence of insanity-Im-
portance of early treatment

• PP. 1-23

PREMONITORY SYMPTOMS OF INSANITY.

Ignorance of the nature of insanity-- Poetical description of insanity by a lunatic-

What is insanity ?- Ignorance of the mental and nerve force—The extent of our
knowledge of the nature of mind and matter-Impossibility of defining insanity-
Suggestions for an improved analysis of morbid mind-Laws governing the
operation of thought-State of the mind between sleeping and waking--Insanity
and dreaming-Are intellectual problems solved during dreams ?-Insanity a
waking dream—Pascal on dreams-Poetry, &c., composed during sleep - Rapidity
of mental action in dreams--Curious case --Resemblance of the phenomena of
dreams to insanity--In dreams the mind is often conscious of its creations-Lucid
intermissions during attacks of insanity-Singular temporary restoration to reason,

30–46

CHAPTER IV.

CONFESSIONS OF PATIENTS AFTER RECOVERING FROM INSANITY;

OR THE CONDITION OF THE MIND WHEN IN A STATE OF

ABERRATION.

The autobiography of the insane interesting and instructive-Indivisibility of mind

-Can the insane accurately describe, after recovery, their previous condition of

disordered mind? - Shakspeare the only correct delineator of insanity-Former
barbarous treatment of the insane-Pivel's efforts to ameliorate the condition of
the insane-Progress in the pathology and therapeutics of insanity-Symptoms
of insanity described by a lady after recovery -- Morbid suggestions in the
incipient stage-Cases of incipient insanity-Case of double consciousness--
Singular case of cipient insanity-Illusions of hearing—Hallucinations of sight
- Letters from patients after recovery-Confessions of the insane after recovery,

47--149

CHAPTER V.

CHAPTER VI.

ANOMALOUS AND MASKED AFFECTIONS OF THE MIND.

Impossibility of defining insanity-Singular case of insanity-Insanity among

children-Symptoms of insanity-Undetected mental disease-Remarks by Dr.

Brierre de Boismont and others on the insanity of early life-Insanity in the

United States of America--Statistics of insanity among children-Hereditary

predisposition to insanity-Incipient symptoms of insanity-Transformations of

character in the early stage of insanity-Exaggerations of natural states of

mind often indicative of insanity-Delusions-Diagnosis of insanity-Obscure

disease of the brain-Latent and unrecognised insanity-Serious results following

a non-recognition of insanity-P'seudo forms of mental disorder-Insidious

approach of insanity-Symptoms of latent insanity-- Alterations of character and

disposition preceding attacks of insanity-Cases of morbid paroxysms of passion-

Temper disease-Curious case of disordered mind-Insanity shown in acts of

brutality-Concealed monomania-Moral character changed by physical injury-

Paralysis of the moral sense, Illustrations of moral idiotey- Shakspeare's de-

scription of this affection-Latent case of monomania-Transformation of cha-

racter caused by physical disease-Effects of diseased brain on the character-

Meteorological influence on the mind--Effect of chloroform on the mind—Resem-

blance of mental phenomena caused by the use of chloroform to insanity-Curious

mental phenomena caused by the absorption of poison in the blood-Singular caso

of hydrophobia affecting the mind-Influence of physical irritation on the mind-

Morbid views of religion-Extraordinary organic change discovered after death in

the membranes of the brain-Brutality and immorality-Cases of erotic monomania

-Speedy cure of a case of insanity--Singular case of concealed insanity-Reck-

lessness in monetary transactions exbibited in the incipient phase of mental dis-

order-Case of undetected insanity-Motiveless acts of brutality connected with

latent insanity-Homicidal insanity-Wail of the homicidal maniac-Duties of the

psychological expert-Importance of the testimony of experts in subtle cases of in-

sanity—I'opular ignorance of insanity-Evidence in cases of alleged lunacy-Case

of Atkinson, the homicidal idiot-Danger of lunatics being at large-Decision of

juries in cases of insanity-Serious consequences of a wrong verdict in commis-

sions de lunatico-Anomalous defective state of the law of lunacy–Justice to

be tempered with mercy

159-224

CHAPTER VII.

THE STAGE OF CONSCIOUSNESS.

Neglect of habits of self-inspection-Innate wickedness of the human heart-

Mysteries of the inner mental life-Consciousness of the approach of insanity

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