Brain, Mind and Medicine:: Essays in Eighteenth-Century Neuroscience

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Harry Whitaker, C.U.M. Smith, Stanley Finger
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 27, 2007 - Medical - 376 pages

No books have been published on the practice of neuroscience in the eighteenth century, a time of transition and discovery in science and medicine. This volume explores neuroscience and reviews developments in anatomy, physiology, and medicine in the era some call the Age of Reason, and others the Enlightenment. Topics include how neuroscience adopted electricity as the nerve force, how disorders such as aphasia and hysteria were treated, Mesmerism, and more.

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Contents

Introduction
3
Introduction
13
Enlightening Neuroscience Microscopes and Microscopy
29
Corpus Curricula Medical Education and the Voluntary
43
Some Thoughts on the Medical Milieu in the Last Quarter
53
Introduction
63
Physiology and Anatomy by François Pourfour du Petit
99
Irritable Glue The HallerWhytt Controversy on the Mechanism
115
Introduction
211
Apoplexy Changing Concepts in the Eighteenth Century
233
of the Nervous System
245
Gentlemans Magazine the Advent of Medical Electricity
257
Therapeutic Attractions Early Applications of Electricity
271
John Wesley on the Estimation and Cure of Nervous Disorders
285
Franz Anton Mesmer and the Rise and Fall of Animal Magnetism
301
Hysteria in the Eighteenth Century
321

The Taming of the Electric Ray From a Wonderful and Dreadful
125
Luigi Galvani Physician Surgeon Physicist From Animal
145
Introduction
161
David Hartleys Neural Vibrations and Psychological Associations
177
Charles Bonnets Neurophilosophy
191
Swedenborg and Localization Theory
201
Introduction
333
Explorations of the Brain Mind and Medicine in
345
Temperament and the Long Shadow of Nerves
353
Index
371
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