A Short History of Anglo-Saxon Freedom: The Polity of the English-speaking Race. Outlined in Its Inception, Development, Diffusion and Present Condition

Front Cover
C. Scribner's sons, 1890 - Anglo-Saxon race - 420 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 386 - Majesty that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of Parliament.
Page 390 - I, AB, do swear, That I do from my heart abhor, detest, and abjure as impious and heretical, that damnable doctrine and position, That princes excommunicated or deprived by the pope, or any authority of the see of Rome, may be deposed or murdered by their subjects, or any other whatsoever.
Page 242 - The efficient secret of the English Constitution may be described as the close union, the nearly complete fusion, of the executive and legislative powers.
Page 391 - Westminster do resolve that William and Mary, prince and princess of Orange, be and be declared king and queen...
Page 385 - And whereas of late great companies of soldiers and mariners have been dispersed into divers counties of the realm, and the inhabitants against their wills have been compelled to receive them into their houses, and there to suffer them to sojourn, against the laws and customs of this realm and to the great grievance and vexation of the people.
Page 387 - By levying money for and to the use of the Crown, by pretence of prerogative, for other time, and in other manner than the same was granted by Parliament. 5. By raising and keeping a standing army within this kingdom in time of peace, without consent of Parliament, and quartering soldiers contrary to law.
Page 390 - ... heirs of the body of Her Majesty; and for default of such issue to Her Royal Highness the princess Anne of Denmark and the heirs of her body...
Page 387 - Whereas the late king James the Second by the assistance of divers evil counsellors, judges and ministers employed by him did endeavour to subvert and extirpate the Protestant religion and the laws and liberties of this kingdom.
Page 371 - HUGH, and others our liegemen, have, in the first place, granted to God, and by this our present Charter confirmed, for us and our heirs forever : 1. That the Church of England shall be free, and have her whole rights, and her liberties inviolable...
Page 105 - It is atheism and blasphemy to dispute what God can do; good Christians content themselves with his will revealed in his Word; so it is presumption and high contempt in a subject to dispute what a king can do; or to say that a king cannot do this or that; but rest in that which is the king's will revealed in his law.

Bibliographic information