The Farmer's Magazine

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Rogerson and Tuxford, 1840 - Agriculture

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Page 80 - the word Value has two different meanings, and sometimes expresses the utility of some particular object, and sometimes the power of purchasing other goods which the possession of that object conveys. The one may be called value in use; the other value in exchange.
Page 80 - When the price of any commodity is neither more nor less than what is sufficient to pay the rent of the land, the wages of the labor, and the profits of the stock employed in raising, preparing, and bringing it to market, according to their natural rates, the commodity is then sold for what may be called its natural price.
Page 45 - I could see them established more generally, and I hope the time is not far distant when I shall...
Page 118 - ... easily destroyed. Are any of the salts of iron present? they may be decomposed by lime. Is there an excess of siliceous sand? the system of improvement must depend on the application of clay and calcareous matter. Is there a defect of calcareous matter ? the remedy is obvious. Is an excess of vegetable matter indicated ? it may be removed by liming, paring, and burning. Is there a deficiency of vegetable matter ? it is to be supplied by manure.
Page 208 - In truth, though a man be neither mechanic nor peasant, but only one having a pot to boil, he is sure to learn from science lessons which will enable him to cook his morsel better, save his fuel, and both vary his dish and improve it.
Page 308 - When plants are watered naturally, the whole air is saturated with humidity at the same time as the soil is penetrated by the rain ; and in this case the aqueous particles mingled with the earth are very gradually introduced into the circulating system, for the moisture of the air prevents a rapid perspiration. Not so when plants in the open air are artificially watered. This operation is usually performed in hot dry weather, and must necessarily be...
Page 14 - ... 1000 parts of a very fertile soil from the banks of the river Parret, in Somersetshire, under the same circumstances, gained 16 grains.
Page 14 - ... 1000 parts of a celebrated soil from Ormiston in East Lothian, which contained more than half its weight of finely divided matter, of which eleven parts were carbonate of lime, and nine parts vegetable matter, when...
Page 80 - ... value in exchange ; and on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange have frequently little or no value in use. Nothing is more useful than water ; but it will purchase scarce any thing ; scarce any thing can be had in exchange for it.
Page 308 - A gentleman once showed me a field which had all the appearance of having been scorched, as if by a burning sun in dry hot weather. The turf peeled from the ground as if it had been cut with a turfing spade, and we then 'discovered that the roots of the grass had been eaten away by the larvae of the cockchafer, which were found in countless numbers at various depths in the soil.

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