A History of England During the Reign of George the Third: 1745-1770

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Contents

Change of political circumstances
288
Chathams projects defeated
294
Chathams projects defeated
296
East India Company
302
Anarchy of the Government
305
Chatham taken ill
308
Lytteltons proposals to Rockingham
312
Suspension of the New York Assembly
315
Physical prostration of Chatham
317
Sir Scurge Haviles bill
323
Meeting at Lord Eglintons
329
working Chathams eloquence
335
General Election State of the ConstituencyWilkes
336
The people awakened
342
Political popularity
343
Popular discontent increases
348
Universal insubordination
349
Internal weakness of the Government
354
Glynn elected for Middlesex
355
Colonel Luttrell declared member
360
Junius attacks Lord Mansfield
366
Vituperation of the Duke of Bedford
370
Supposed authorship of the letters of Junius
372
Disastrous colonial policy
376
Lord Hillsboroughs threat to dissolve the Assembly
378
Public excitement at Boston
382
Indiscretion of the patriots surpassed by the Government
384
CHAPTER X
402
The royal speech
408
Camdens want of delicate feeling
414
Rockinghams motion
420
ADDENDA
427
Sir George Saviles attack on ministers
433
The citys interposition
442
Lord Norths conduct Wedderburns speech
448
Chatham moves an address to the crown
457
Debate on Irish affairs
463
Sheriff Townsends resistance to the landtax
465
Secessions from the government 407
476
Upworthy proceeding in the Lords
495
Excitement of the Commons
501
ADDENDA
507
Court Whigs and Country
513
Former character of the Commons
520
Members by purchase
527
Dr Johnson a partizan
536
Rhetoric distinguished from eloquence
542
Present authority of the Speaker
548

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Page 259 - Britain ; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, had, hath, and of right ought to have, full Power and Authority to make Laws and Statutes of sufficient Force and Validity to bind the Colonies and People of America, Subjects of the Crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.
Page 316 - He made an administration so checkered and speckled ; he put together a piece of joinery so crossly indented and whimsically dovetailed, a cabinet so variously inlaid, such a piece of diversified mosaic, such a tesselated pavement without cement, — here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white, patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans, whigs and tories, treacherous friends and open enemies, — that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to...
Page 246 - In such a cause, your success would be hazardous. America, if she fell, would fall like the strong man. She would embrace the pillars of the state, and pull down the constitution along with her.
Page 244 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people, so dead to all the feelings of liberty as voluntarily to submit to be slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of the rest.
Page 394 - That the Americans had purchased their liberty at a dear rate, since they had quitted their native country, and gone in search of freedom to a desert.* * " They left their native land in search of freedom, and found it in a detert,
Page 316 - He made an administration, so checkered and speckled; he put together a piece of joinery, so crossly indented and whimsically dove-tailed; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified Mosaic; such a tesselated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone, and there a bit of white; patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans; whigs and tories; treacherous friends and open enemies : that it was indeed a very curious show; but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand...
Page 46 - He has a kind of unhappiness in his temper, which, if it be not conquered before it has taken too deep a root, will be a source of frequent anxiety. Whenever he is displeased, his anger does not break out with heat and violence ; but he becomes sullen and silent, and retires to his closet ; not to compose his mind by study or contemplation, but merely to indulge the melancholy enjoyment of his own ill-humour. Even when the fit is ended, unfavourable symptoms very frequently return, which indicate...
Page 174 - That this kingdom has the sovereign, the supreme legislative power over America, is granted. It cannot be denied; and taxation is a part of that sovereign power.
Page xxiii - The weight of irremoveable royal displeasure is a load too great to move under : it must crush any man ; it has sunk and broke me. I succumb ; and wish for nothing but a decent and innocent retreat, wherein I may no longer, by continuing in the public stream of promotion, for ever stick fast aground, and afford to the world the ridiculous spectacle of being passed by every boat that navigates the same river.
Page 542 - BECKER'S CHARICLES; a Tale illustrative of Private Life among the Ancient Greeks : with Notes and Excursuses. New Edition. Post Svo.

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