A History of Indian Philosophy, Volume 1

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1997 - Hindu philosophy - 528 pages
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The work appears in five volumes. Vol. I comprises Buddhist and Jaina Philosophy and the six systems of Hindu thought, viz.., Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisesika, Mimamsa and Vedanta. It also contains the philosophy of the Yogavasistha, the Bhagavadgita and speculations in the medical schools. Vol. III contains an elaborate account of the Principal Dualistic and Pluralistic Systems such as the philosophy of the Pancaratra, Bhaskara, Yamuna, Ramanuja, Nimbarka, Vijnanabhiksu and philosophical speculations of some of the selected Puranas. Vol. IV deals with the Bhagavata Purana, Madhva and his School, Vallabha, Caitanya, Jiva Gosvami and Baladeva Vidyabhusana. Vol. V treats the Southern Schools of Saivism, viz., Saiva Siddhanta, Vira Saivism, philosophy of Srikantha. Saiva Philosophy in the Puranas and in some important texts. In the words of the Oxford Journal 'the collection of data, editing and the interpretation of every school of thought is a feat unparalleled in the field of history of philosophy.'
 

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Contents

The Vedas and their antiquity 2 The place of the Vedas in the Hindu mind
2
Classification of the Vedic literature
3
The Samhitās
4
The Brahmaņas
5
The Aranyakas
6
The RgVeda its civilization
7
The Vedic gods
8
Polytheism Henotheism and Monotheism
9
Knowledge its value for us 9 The Doctrine of Syadvāda
181
Theory of Perception
183
NonPerceptual knowledge 172 173 173 175 176 179
185
Knowledge as Revelation
186
The Jivas 15 Karma Theory
190
Karma Asrava and Nirjarā 17 Pudgala
195
Dharma Adharma Ākāśa
197
Kāla and Samaya
198

Growth of a Monotheistic tendency Prajapati Viśvakarma II Brahma 12 Sacrifice the First Rudiments of the Law of Karma 13 CosmogonyMythologi...
10
Place of Brahman in the Upanisads
11
The World
12
The WorldSoul
13
The Theory of Causation
14
Doctrine of Transmigration
15
Emancipation
16
38
17
wwwwwx 28 30 38 41 42 44 45 555 51 52 52 53
28
CHAPTER IV
62
Growth of the Philosophic Literature
65
The Indian systems of Philosophy
67
Some fundamental points of agreement 1 The Karma theory
71
The Doctrine of Mukti
74
The Doctrine of Soul 5 The Pessimistic Attitude towards the World and the Optimistic
75
The State of Philosophy in India before Buddha
78
his Life
81
Early Buddhist Literature
82
The Doctrine of Causal Connection of early Buddhism
84
The Khandhas
93
Avijjā and Āsava
99
Sila and Samādhi
100
Kamma
101
Upanisads and Buddhism PAGE
111
99
112
The Schools of Theravada Buddhism II Mahāyānism 13 The Madhyamika or the Sunyavada schoolNihilism 112
125
Uncompromising Idealism or the School of Vijñānavāda Buddhism
145
65
147
Sautrāntika theory of Perception 129 138 145
151
Sautrāntika theory of Inference
155
The Doctrine of Momentariness
158
The Doctrine of Momentariness and the Doctrine of Causal Efficiency Arthakriyākāritva
163
Some Ontological Problems on which the Different Indian Systems diverged
164
Brief Survey of the Evolution of Buddhist Thought
166
CHAPTER VI
169
Two Sects of Jainism
170
The Canonical and other Literature of the Jains
171
Some General Characteristics of the Jains
172
Life of Mahāvīra The Fundamental Ideas of Jaina Ontology
173
The Doctrine of Relative Pluralism Anekāntavāda
175
The Doctrine of Nayas
176
PAGE
177
Jaina Cosmography 21 Jaina Yoga
199
Jaina Atheism 23 Mokşa emancipation
207
208
211
Causation as Satkāryavāda the theory that the effect potentially exists before it is generated by the movement of the cause
257
Samkhya Atheism and Yoga Theism
258
Buddhi and Purușa 20 The Cognitive Process and some characteristics of Citta
261
Sorrow and its Dissolution 22 Citta
265
Yoga Purificatory Practices Parikarma
270
The Yoga Meditation
271
CHAPTER VIII
274
Criticism of Buddhism and Samkhya from the Nyāya standpoint 2 Nyaya and Vaiseṣika sūtras 3 Does Vaiśesika represent an old school of Mimämsā ...
276
71
304
The main doctrine of the NyayaVaiśeşika Philosophy
310
Dravya Guņa Karma Sāmānya Viśeṣa Sama
313
Faith in the end 75
317
The Theory of Causation
319
Dissolution Pralaya and Creation Sṛşti
323
Proof of the Existence of Isvara 323 13 The NyayaVaiśeşika Physics
325
The four Pramāņas of Nyāya 14 The Origin of Knowledge Pramāņa 326
330
Perception Pratyakşa 332 17 Inference
332
Upamana and Sabda
333
The necessity of the Acquirement of debating devices for the seeker
360
The Doctrine of Soul
362
A Comparative Review
367
The place of Senseorgans in Perception
375
The Nature of Knowledge
382
CHAPTER X
406
Vedanta Literature
418
Vedanta and Sankara 788820 A D
429
The main idea of the Vedanta philosophy
439
The nature of the worldappearance phenomena
445
Unity in Indian Sadhana philosophical religious and ethical endeavours
447
The Definition of Ajñāna nescience
452
Anirvācyavāda and the Vedanta dialectic
461
Vedanta theory of Perception and Inference
470
Vedanta theory of Illusion 485
485
Vedanta and other Indian systems
492
362
498
363
501
199
506
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