Cartae Shakespeareanae: Shakespeare Documents; a Chronological Catalogue of Extant Evidence Relating to the Life and Works of William Shakespeare

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G. Bell and sons, 1904 - Literary Criticism - 107 pages
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Page 98 - Yet must I not give nature all; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part. For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion ; and, that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, Such as thine are, and strike the second heat Upon the Muses...
Page 2 - Man. 31. 6d. Chalmers on the Adaptation of External Nature to the Moral and Intellectual Constitution of Man. 5.?.
Page 16 - Yes, trust them not: for there is an upstart crow beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart, wrapt in a player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you; and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.
Page 95 - Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room: Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Page 4 - On the Nature of the Gods, Divination, Fate, Laws, a Republic, Consulship. Translated by Prof. CD Yonge, MA, and Francis Barham.
Page 18 - Craven.' With 62 Engravings on Wood after Harvey, and 9 Engravings on Steel, chiefly after A. Cooper, RA 5*.
Page 7 - FLORENCE OF WORCESTER'S Chronicle, with the Two Continuations : comprising Annals of English History from the Departure of the Romans to the Reign of Edward I.
Page 5 - History of the House of Austria (1218-1792). With a Continuation from the Accession of Francis I. to the Revolution of 1848. 4 vols.
Page 95 - To draw no envy, Shakespeare, on thy name, Am I thus ample to thy book and fame, While I confess thy writings to be such As neither man nor muse can praise too much. 'Tis true, and all men's suffrage. But these ways Were not the paths I meant unto thy praise : For...

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