An Introduction to Municipal Law: Designed for General Readers, and for Students in Colleges and Higher Schools

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D. Appleton, 1880 - Law - 544 pages
 

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Contents

CHAPTER I
57
1st General Assemblies of citizens 2d Representative Assem
61
Representative Assemblies common in all times
65
The Soman Law during the Middle Ages and its connection with
68
The power of the Executive he is really a coordinate branch of
73
Divisions of Statutes in respect to their forms
83
General statement of the method by which the Unwritten Law is promulgated
98
State of the law in the Western Empire at the barbarian conquest 600
99
General character of judicial procedure
102
The Romans did not commit the decision of such questions to men drawn
108
Reason why the same causes did not result in the permanent jury trial in other
116
trial by recognitors or witnesses of the transaction or persons
125
The evidence was afterward required to be offered to them in open court
131
Growing disposition in England and America to abandon it
138
The Saxon General Council
144
Establishment of Court of Common Pleas at Westminster
150
United States Courts the creations of constitutions and statutes
156
English Court of Chancery 163165
163
Purely ecclesiastical jurisdiction
169
Description and jurisdiction of these Courts
172
Commencement of the action and proceedings against the judgment debtor
178
What differenced various formulas
184
Interdicts
191
Primitive divisions of actions into Real and Personal
197
The judicial invention of the actions of Trover and Ejectment
204
Abuses of the forms of pleading
211
Reasons why equitable rules grew up to supplement those used in the
218
HI OF THE POLITICAL ORGANIZATION THE GOVERNMENT THE MEANS OF ADMINIS
219
Instances of defects and remedies relief against a bond already paid
224
How the consideration of these questions came to be referred to the Chan
230
parties and persons pecuniarily
236
persons interested
238
Purpose of this chapter 356
243
Written evidence cannot be altered by oral testimony
244
General rules regulating the introduction of evidence on trials
250
must be confined to the subject
257
Rules of Evidence in German Criminal Trials
263
its nature
269
Comparison between English and German methods
276
Decision of the cause before other judges than those who take the evidence
278
Action of judges who decide both facts and law
282
The law has been developed in all countries by statutes and by judicial
289
Comparison in respect to the requisite of comprehensiveness or power
334
Furtum or Theft 596
342
Conclusion
343
CHAPTER IV
351
General influence of the AngloSaxons upon our law
357
SECTION FIRST
359
Object of this chapter
363
The Right of Personal Security
366
CHAPTER II
369
Peculiar rights of the Eorl
370
The Right of Personal Liberty
372
THE FEUDAL SYSTEM
375
OF PROPERTY
376
Folkland and Bocland
383
The Right to acquire and enjoy Private Property
387
The King 391
391
The Hundred and Shire Courts
397
Tlte power of disregarding these constitutional guarantees of life liberty
398
General character of methods for preventing and punishing crimes pecu
403
meaning
405
compurgation and the ordeal
409
Necessity of a knowledge of feudal institutions to an understanding
417
not bring the system with them completed but only the seeds
425
SECTION SECOND
429
Extent of the system in the ninth tenth and eleventh centuries
433
Importance of this subject 677
435
These benefices or fiefs were originally for life or hereditary
440
Recapitulation of rights guaranteed by the Constitution 679
445
Oath of fealty
446
Neither could withdraw from the relation without consent of the other
452
power of the lords
462
In determining this meaning and the powers of the Government under
468
Picture of society at the height of feudalism
470
This preference and distinction is shown
476
Effect of the feudal system on civilization in Europe
487
Causes of the decline of the Feudal System 493
493
Sketch of the primitive social and political organization of the Romans
497
Persons acquiring and holding rights for themselves sui juris and those
505
Comprehensive description of the Roman family 515517
515
Succession to the estate of a deceased person
527
Obligations arising from faults ex maleficio
535

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