Report of a Tour in Bundelkhand and Malwa, 1871-72: And in the Central Provinces, 1873-74

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Office of the Superitendent of Government Printing, 1878 - Bundelkhand (India) - 252 pages
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Page 124 - ... and cut through by the groove or channel subsequently roughly and rudely cut on the surface to let out the libations poured on the lingam. The lingam appears to have been set up just at the topmost line of the second inscription, and, as stated, the channel for letting off the libations is carried mercilessly through the inscription to the narrow end. It is evident that the first inscription is very old, dating to before the Christian era; the second inscription is later, but was cut evidently...
Page 49 - Panna and is now reverenced as a saint ; his tomb, with an inscription, of which I took a copy, exists at Panna, and people of the district who have not seen it assert that a large diamond is inserted in his tomb, but it has such miraculous adhesion to the stone that it cannot be extracted and stolen. The mine that goes by his name has been the most productive in the district, and it is possible that he may have been the first to point out the existence of diamonds in the ferruginous gravel of the...
Page 24 - Raisa' as Alha's father, he must have been a Jain by religion. The fort of Mahoba, if fort it be, consists of a long wall running chiefly along the crest of the hills on the north bank of the Madan Sagar, and descending down its slope to the water at the two ends. The wall is built exclusively of fragments of older structures, some plain, some carved, and some simply rubble ; no part of it can, as it stands, be, I think, ascribed to the Hindus. The Kakra Marh temple in the Madan Sagar, and the remains...
Page 197 - Savari worshipped Rama, and as a boon asked that her name should precede his, hence the name of the place Savari Narayana shortened to Seorinarayan ; a similar legend, it will be remembered, accounts for the name Rajib Lochana, and both are equally unworthy of credit. The existence of the Buddhist statue shows that Buddhism flourished here anciently, but no inscriptions or other Buddhist records are now to be found. It is, however, worthy of note, that the Saivic statue described above is merely...
Page 185 - ... like the Buddhist pillars with medallions found at Barahut and Gaya, but filled with exquisite scroll work and, of course, devoid of the elliptical rail holes at the sides ; and a number of other fragments of no special interest ; but from what the villagers say a number of finely-sculptured pillars have been removed and carried off by private individuals to various places by water-carriage. The mound, before it was dug into, is said to have been 2 porsas (fathoms) higher than now at the west...
Page 222 - ... the existing hand; she has the elephant for a symbol on her pedestal ; there are numerous fragments besides, among which is a Ganeca and a Hanuman ; the last, however, from its coarse execution, is evidently of a later age. The three gates lead, the first two down to Bagdara village, the last down to Surka village; there is no gate due south facing Tartuma. The hill rises with steep slopes all round from the bottom to within a few feet of the tableland which then rises up with vertical rock faces,...
Page 217 - ... feet, which is tolerably large for a dome of overlapping courses as at Sohagpur; the mahamandapa here also has had extra pillars added in front, in line with the side pilasters of the sanctum entrance, to support an architrave which had failed ; these pillars are not of a kind with the others, and are quite out of place, hiding the exquisite carving behind, on the sides of the entrance of the sanctum. The dome of the mahamandapa consists of courses of concentric fretted circles each smaller than...
Page 135 - Beyond the fort, to the east, is the city : here are a few modem temples of no interest, and two other older ones on the bank and one in the dry bed (it is said) of a tank ; they are small and of no interest. Numerous tanks, some dry, are to be seen about the city to its south and to its north. At the east end of the city, and to the north of the road, which likewise, marks the customs line, are several old temples. One group consists of seven temples, of which two are quite modern, built of the...
Page 39 - Kadiyagaon goes on to Kunch. At Kunch are a number of remains of the Hindu period in the shape of pillars, architraves, &c. Two domes on twelve pillars each are traditionally ascribed to the commanders of Prithi Raj when he invaded Mahobd. There is also another dome, which, however, is said to be a Muhammadan tomb. Near one of the old domes is a small pool called Chora...
Page 140 - ... Nagpur), through Deotek close past Palasgarh, past Banjari (a great mart for articles of traffic by pack animals), past Ambagarh Chowki (which possesses a small fort of no interest, and probably not very old), past Balod, Sorar, to Gowror, whence it branched into two, one going via...

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