Pioneers of civilisation, by the author of 'Crimson pages'.

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Page 123 - Not as the conqueror comes, They, the true-hearted, came ; Not with the roll of the stirring drums, And the trumpet that sings of fame; Not as the flying come, In silence and in fear; They shook the depths of the desert gloom With their hymns of lofty cheer.
Page 141 - ... you shall be governed by laws of your own making, and live a free, and, if you will, a sober and industrious people. I shall not usurp the right of any, or oppress his person. God has furnished me with a better resolution, and has given me His grace to keep it. In short, whatever sober and free men can reasonably desire for the security and improvement of their own happiness, I shall heartily comply with, and in five months resolve, if it please God, to see you.
Page 132 - I think I can clearly say that before these present troubles broke out, the English did not possess one foot of land in this colony but what was fairly obtained by honest purchase of the Indian proprietors.
Page 150 - To associate all the branches of mankind ; And if a boundless plenty be the robe, Trade is the golden girdle of the globe. Wise to promote whatever end he means, God opens fruitful nature's various scenes : Each climate needs what other climes produce, And offers something to the general use ; No land but listens to the common call, And in return receives supply from all.
Page 13 - Let others better mould the running mass Of metals, and inform the breathing brass, And soften into flesh, a marble face; Plead better at the bar; describe the skies, And when the stars descend, and when they rise. But Rome! 'tis thine alone, with awful sway, To rule mankind, and make the world obey, Disposing peace and war, thy own majestic way: To tame the proud, the fettered slave to free: — These are imperial arts, and worthy thee.
Page 39 - They should be good servants and of quick intelligence, since I see that they very soon say all that is said to them, and I believe that they would easily be made Christians, for it appeared to me that they had no creed.
Page 194 - Rome is notorious, has, however, the candor to own, that this was an iron age, barren of all goodness; a leaden age, abounding in all wickedness; and a dark age, remarkable above all others for the scarcity of writers, and men of learning...
Page 140 - FRIENDS: — I wish you all happiness here and hereafter. These are to let you know that it hath pleased God in his providence, to cast you within my lot and care. It is a business, that, though I never undertook before, yet God hath given me an understanding of my duty, and an honest- mind to do it uprightly.
Page 214 - And the pilgrims were followed by the devouring gaze of an astonished crowd. " At the great council, Marquette published to them the one true God, their creator. He spoke, also, of the great captain of the French, the Governor of Canada, who had chastised the Five Nations and commanded peace ; and he questioned them respecting the Mississippi and the tribes that possessed its banks. For the messengers, who announced the subjection of the Iroquois, a magnificent festival was prepared of hominy, and...
Page 146 - Oh that thou mayst be kept from the evil that would overwhelm thee ! that, faithful to the God of thy mercies, in the life of righteousness thou mayst be preserved to the end ! My soul prays to God for .thee, that thou mayst stand in the day of trial, that thy children may be blessed of the Lord, and thy people saved by his power.

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