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Book set forth in the Time of King Edward the Sixth, mentioned in the said Six and thirtieth Article; any thing in the said Article, or in any Statute, Act, or Canon beretofore bad or made to the contrary thereof, in any wise notwithstanding.

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This being premised, the Thirty Sixth Article contains Three Propositions. 1. The Book of Consecration of Arch-bishops

and Bishops, and ordering of Priests and Deacons, lately set forth in the Time of Edward the Sixth, and confirmed at the same time by Authority of Parliament (and afterwards altered in the Fourteenth Year of King Charles the Second) doth contain all things necessary to

fuch Confecrating and Ordering.
2. The Book of Consecration of Arch-bishops

and Biftops, and ordering of Priests and Dea-
cons, lately set forth in the Time of Edward
the Sixth, and confirmed at the same time by
Authority of Parliament (and afterwards al-
tered in the Fourteenth Year of King Charles
the Second) hath not any thing that of it self

is superstitious and ungodly.
3. Whosoever are consecrated or ordered accor-

ding to the Rites of that Book, since the Se-
cond Year of the aforenam'd King Edward,
unto this Time, or hereafter shall be confe-
crated or ordered according to the same Rices,
we decree all such to be rightly, orderly, and

lawfully confecrated and ordered.
The First and Second Propositions suppose, accor-
ding to the Doctrin of the Twenty third Article,
that the Persons who consecrate or ordain, have
Authority so to do. The only Question therefore

is

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is concerning the Form prescribed in that Book for such Confecration or Ordination. And the Church affirms that that Book doth contain all things necessary to the same. This being observ'd, the Truth of both Propositions will appear at first sight to such as peruse the Book.

The Third Proposition is the necessary Consequence of the First and Second, But see the Fourth Chapter of the Third Part of the Confutation of Popery.

Here it will be proper to give some account of a Difficulty arising from the Interpretation of the Subscription to this Article, which was before recited from the Fourteenth of King Charles the Second. Since by that Act our Subscription to this Article must be understood of the Book of Consecration, &c. as it was then altered : therefore the Third Proposition, when expressed at full length, must run thus,

" Whosoever is Confecrated or Ordered accor

ding to the Rites of that Book, which was set « forth and confirmed by Parliament in King Edward the Sixth's Days, and was afterwards al“ tered and confirmed again in the Fourteenth of

King Charles the Second; I say, whosoever has “ been Consecrated or Ordered by that Book since “ the Second Year of King Edward unto this time,

or hereafter shall be confecrated or ordered ac

cording to the same Rites, we decree all such to “ be rightly, orderly, and lawfully consecrated " and ordered.

But is it not then strange, that our Church should now be supposed to speak of Persons Consecrated or Ordered since the Second of King Edward, according to the Rites of the Book as it stood altered in the Reign of King Charles the Second? And

wou'd

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wou'd our' Lawgivers impose on us a Subscription to the Proposition above rehearsed? I conceive therefore. that our Subscription does at present oblige us to acknowledge the Validity of those Ordinations only, which have been and shall be made according to that Book since the above-mentioned Alteration of it. But then, because the Validity of our Succession depends upon the Validity of the prior Ordinations ; therefore we ought to satisfy our felves concerning them, tho' our Church does not bind us to an explicit Confirmation of them. And whoever will compare the Forms of Consecration and Ordination confirm'd in King Edward's Time, with the Book as 'twas altered in the Fourteenth of King Charles the Second, will be soon convinced, that this Proposition has no real Difficulty in it, either as it was understood formerly, or as 'tis now to be understood by reason of the Parliamentary Interpretation.

I will add to prevent some Scruples which may posibly arise) Dr. Burges's Interpretation of the Subscription to this Article, which is in the Paper before mentioned ; and is therefore warranted by unexceptionable Authority. His Words are these: IX. Of the Book of Ordination of Bishops, Priests and

Deacons. I conceive that Subscription to this Book does not intend an Approbation of every Phrase, or Application of every Place of Scripture therein alledged, asfitly applied: but only that the Calling of Bishops to govern the Church, and the Ordination of Inferior Ministers by them to the Uses there assigned, are not contrary to the Word of God, and

so I subscribe to that Book.

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The THIRTY SEVENTH ARTICLE.

Of the Civil Magistrates.
HE Queen's Majesty bath the chief Power in this

realm of England, and other her Dominions, unto whom the chief government of all estates of this realm, whether they be Ecclefiaftical or Civil, in all Causes doth appertain, and is not, nor ought to be subječt to any foreign jurisdiktion.

Where we attribute to the Queen's Majesty the chief government, by which titles we understand the minds of some sanderous folks to be offended : we give not to our Princes the ministring either of God's word, ori of the sacraments, the which thing the injunctions also lately set forth by Elizabeth our Queen do most plainly testify : but that only prerogative which we see to have been given always to all godly Princes in holy scriptures by God himself; that is, that they pould rule all estates and degrees committed to their charge by, God, whether they be Ecclesiastical or Temporal, and restrain with the Civil sword the stubborn and evil doers.

The Bishop of Rome hath no jurisdiction in this realm of England.

The laws of the realm may punish Christian men with death for beinous and grievous offences.

It is lawful for Christian men, at the commandment of the Magistrate, to wear weapons, and serve in the Wars.

This Article contains Six Propositions.
1. The Queen's Majesty has the chief Power in

this Realm of England, and other her Domini-
ons, unto whom the chief Government of all
Estates of this Realm, whether they be Eccle-

M

fiaftical

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siastical or Civil, in all Causes, doth apper

tain. 2. The Queen's Majesty is not, nor ought to

be subject to any Forein Jurisdiction. 3. Where we attribute to the Queen's Majesty

the chief Government, by which Titles we understand the Minds of some flanderous Folks to be offended ; we give not to our Princes the Ministring either of God's Word, or of the Sacraments, the which thing the Injunctions also set forth by Elizabeth our Queen do most plainly testify : but that only Prerogative, which we see to have been given always to all godly Princes in the Holy Scriptures by God himself, that is, that they should rule all Estates and Degrees, committed to their Charge by God, whether they be Ecclesiastical or Temporal, and restrain with the Civil Sword the

stubborn and evil Doers. 4. The Bishop of Rome has no Jurisdiction in this

Realm of England. 5. The Laws of the Realm may punish Christian

Men with Death for heinous and grievous Of

fences. 6. It is lawful for Christian Men, at the Com

mandment of the Magistrate, to wear Wea

pons, and serve in the Wars. The First Proposition. See the Discourse of the Independency of the Church on the State, Chap.

The Second Proposition. There is no Plea for any Forein Jurisdiction, but what is made in favor of the Pope's usurp'd Authority; of which sec the Fourth Propofition.

The

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