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Office of the Superintendent of Government Printing, 1878 - Excavations (Archaeology)
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Page 91 - I do not mean to imply that more ancient statues do not exist ; I mean only that inscribed Brahmanical ones, fixing the age of the statue indisputably, have not yet been found of a date anterior to this. It is very remarkable that this oldest statue should be a varaha. I should expect that if any inscribed statues, older than this, of the Vaishnavic pantheon be discovered, they would probably be either of the fish or tortoise incarnations of Vishnu, for it appears to me that the account in Hindu...
Page 195 - ... brick walls. The sanctum of the temple leans over considerably, and the mouldings of the basement have got broken and greatly distorted in consequence. The sanctum has a roof of intersecting squares, supported. on four corner pilasters ; these are plain, but broken up along their length by a block or projecting moulding; they are surmounted by corbelled capitals ; the faces are ornamented by plain geometrical patterns ; the pillars in front of the sanctum are profusely sculptured, and the sculpture...
Page 26 - JRaiea" as Alha's father, he must have been a Jain by religion. The fort of Mahoba, if fort it be, consists of a long wall running chiefly along the crest of the hills on the north bank of the Madan Sagar, and descending down its slope to the water at the two ends. The wall is built exclusively of fragments of older structures, some plain, some carved, and some simply rubble ; no part of it can, as it stands, be, I think, ascribed to the Hindus. The Kakra Marh temple in. the Madan...
Page 155 - Researches about the seizure of llama's sacrificial horse by Raja Raju Lochana, and the destruction of Satrughna by Kardama Rishi, the subsequent arrival of Rama and amicable adjustment of disputes by Rama's consenting to reside at Rajam in the worship of Siva, and the consequent formation of the statue of Rama in his form of Rajib Lochana, appears to be merely an allegorical record of the struggles of the Saivic and Vaishnavic religions in these parts. The main incidents, divested of their miraculous...
Page 239 - ... of 4 temples, all large ones ; of these, most, if not the whole, appear to have been Jain ; not far from these is the tank known as Sobhnath, on the margin of which are collected numerous Jain fragments ; the banks of the tank are covered with an uninterrupted chain of ruins; there are Brahmanical fragments also to be seen lying about, but not among the ruins in the vicinity of this tank ; this portion of the city appears clearly to have been exclusively Jain.
Page 126 - ... sides containing a little muddy water ; the stone is found near the surface. The temple faces east. Close to and alongside it must have stood another similar temple, of which ruins now exist. This temple (and also the last) was Saivic, as the argha which contained the lingam still exists in situ ; this argha contains an old inscription. The inscribed slab, or argha, is an oblong trapezoid of roughgrained, quartzy sandstone, worn smooth in places by the feet of villagers and wayfarers, it being...
Page 151 - The front of the hall is open, the sides are closed, but with narrow door- ways : it is at the side of the northern narrow entrance that the illegible inscription is let in. Both the cells have tower roofs surmounted by the usual amalaka fruit; but what is particularly noticeable is the form of the amalaka, quite different to the usual antique form ; it is in fact a composite thing, consisting of several discs piled on each other of gradually diminishing diameters and with narrow spaces between....
Page 35 - The central hall, from its size, height, and the evident massiveness of all constructive details, produces a striking effect : the domes are all hemispherical, with, perhaps, the slightest possible inclination towards a bulge ; these domes are crowned by foliated caps of enormous size, which make the form of the domes unpleasing : the colors used are red, blue, yellow, and green ; the arches are of stone and brick, as also the walls.
Page 126 - ... mercilessly through the inscription to the narrow end. It is evident that the first inscription is very old, dating to before the Christian era; the second inscription is later, but was cut evidently with some regard for the prior inscription, as it does not interfere with or injure it. Long ages afterwards, evidently when no one could read the inscriptions, this great slab, large enough to occupy the entire breadth of the sanctum of a temple, was considered very convenient to form into an argha,...
Page 224 - ... short off ; another six-armed female holds a sword in the existing hand ; she has the elephant for a symbol on her pedestal ; there are numerous fragments besides, among which is a Ganeca and a Hanuman ; the last, however, from its coarse execution, is evidently of a later age. The three gates lead, the first two down to Bagdara village, the last down to Surka village; there is no gate due south facing Tartuma. The hill rises with steep slopes all round from the bottom to within a few feet of...

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