History of the Battle of Lake Erie: And Miscellaneous Papers

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R. Bonner's sons, 1891 - Lake Erie, Battle of, 1813 - 264 pages
 

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Page 113 - No people can be bound to acknowledge and adore the invisible hand which conducts the affairs of men more than the people of the United States. Every step by which they have advanced to the character of an independent nation seems to have been distinguished by some token of providential agency...
Page 114 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 202 - LINES TO A LADY WEEPING.* WEEP, daughter of a royal line, A Sire's disgrace, a realm's decay ; Ah ! happy if each tear of thine Could wash a father's fault away ! Weep — for thy tears are Virtue's tears — Auspicious to these suffering isles ; And be each drop in future years Repaid thee by thy people's smiles ! THE CHAIN I GAVE.
Page 113 - ... it would be peculiarly improper to omit in this first official act my fervent supplications to that Almighty Being who rules over the universe, who presides in the councils of nations, and whose providential aids can supply every human defect, that His benediction may consecrate to the liberties and happiness of the people of the United States a Government instituted by themselves for these essential purposes, and may enable every instrument employed in its administration to execute with success...
Page 106 - This also is the praise of Washington : that never in the tide of time has any man lived who had in so great a degree the almost divine faculty to command the trust of his fellowmen and rule the willing.
Page 128 - ... too, like a meteor, to repel her foes. That name, in the days of peace, was a loadstone, attracting to itself a whole people's confidence, a whole people's love, and the whole world's respect. That name, descending with all time, spreading over the whole earth, and uttered in all the languages belonging to the tribes and races of men, will forever be pronounced with affectionate gratitude by every one in whose breast there shall arise an aspiration for human rights and human liberty.
Page 87 - She comes to us with tidings of that which for us still lives, of that which has become the life of our life. She embalms and preserves for us the life-blood, not of master-spirits only, but of generations of the race.
Page 84 - The authors of the American revolution avowed for their object the welfare of mankind, and believed that they were in the service of their own and of all future generations. Their faith was just ; for the world of mankind does not exist in fragments, nor can a country have an insulated existence. All men are brothers ; and all are bondsmen for one another.
Page 102 - ... belief in God, and trust in his overruling power, formed the essence of his character. Divine wisdom not only illumines the spirit, it inspires the will. Washington was a man of action, and not of theory or words; his creed appears in his life, not in his professions, which burst from him very rarely, and only at those great moments of crisis in the fortunes of his country, when earth and heaven seemed actually to meet, and his emotions became too intense for suppression; but his...
Page 98 - His faculties were so well balanced and combined that his constitution, free from excess, was tempered evenly with all the elements of activity, and his mind resembled a well-ordered commonwealth; his passions, which had the intensest vigor, owned allegiance to reason ; and with all the fiery quickness of his spirit, his impetuous and massive will was held in check by consummate judgment. He had in his composition a calm, which gave him in moments of highest excitement the power of self-control,...

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