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be most fytt ÆTATE, ERUDITIONE, GRAVITATE ET PRUDENTIA is nowe altogether superfluous, because all elections be now cleane taken from the body and derived to the Mrs. of houses.

8. Cap. 50o. NEMO IN COLLEGIUM ALIQUOD THEOLOGORUM ADMITTATUR SOCIUS, NISI SIT ACTUALIS BACCALAUREUS ARTIUM, this statute is injurious to the Kinges colledge, and contrarie to Kinge Edwarde's and this Queene's Majesties injunctions which in the same clause excepted the Kinges Colledge.

AN ANSWERE TO THE PRETENSED GRIEFFES

OF CERTEYNE OF THE

BODIE OF THE UNIVERSITIE FOR THE NECESSARIE AND PROFI-
OF CERTAYNE PRIVILEDGES AND CUSTOMS

TABLE

ALTERATION

GREATLIE ABUSED BY DIVERS OF THE FORESAID BODIE, THE
WHICH BE REFORMED ONLY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF VERTUE
AND LERNINGE AND THE MAYNTENANCE OF GOOD ORDRE, SET
FOURTH BY THE QUEENS MATIES. AUTHORITIE AND PUBLIKELIE

REDD AND GENERALLY RECEIVED BY THE WHOLE UNIVERSITIE

WITH GREAT QUIETNESSE UNTIL THESE TWO PROCTORS MR. BEA-
CON AND MR. PURESYE ENTRED INTO THEIR OFFICES.

THE ELECTION OF THE VICECHANCELLOR.

THE Mrs of Colleges neither were nor have any occasion to be desirouse of that office the which is so paynfull and troblsome, neither have the regentes especially in this licentious tyme so much respect of the worthynesse of the personn as theie have to labour by all meenes possible agaynst such as theie thinke will execute statutes, and [not?] beare with their licentiousnes and disordre, for the whiche causes it is to be feared or ought longe, that wise and grave men (if theie shall not be well assisted by those that be in authoritie) must be rather enforced to take the same office, then theie shall ambitiously by the pleasinge of younge men seke the same, the which is arrogantly objected by these complaynours neither is he worthie to be Mr of a Colledge which seketh to please his company for an office sake.

THE CAUSES OF ALTERING THIS STATUTE.

1. At the tyme of the makinge of thold statute theie were allmost all regents that were of all degrees in the universitie and that auncyent men for the moste parte: but nowe theie be not only younger in age: but more youthful and intractable at this daie, then theie were wounte to be in tymes paste.

2. It is thought very mete that he that should be the heade of the regentes and non regentes shoulde be chosen by them both and not by the younger sorte of regentes only according to thold statute, the which younger sorte do daylie encrease more and

more.

3. To name twoe mete men in the whole bodie of the university, whereof one shoulde be chosen was thought very necessarie both for thavoydinge of great contentions and factions, labor and the practise of diverse that have subtillie gone about to preferr very contentiouse persons and to put awaye the ambition of some and the inhabilitie of other some desirouse of that office, cheiflye for the mayntenaunce of disordere, and if there should be anie more sett upp then twoe to the regentes and non regentes we all knowe by good experience that it would be very harde to have anie quyet election at all, such is their practises for the defetinge of elections declared of late, that it will be impossible to have anie election at all if there were anie more propounded.

4. For the which causes it was ordered by injunction in tymes paste that there should be twoe only sett upp for the office of the Vicechancellor.

5. The heades of the Colledges being fowerteen in nombre, and havinge the cheif charge and care in government do best knowe whoe are most mete for that office, whereby they are greatly assisted for their better and quyet regimen of their severall Colledges.

6. Other Drs of the university be either for the most parte absent for their private commoditie or els being present have not so muche care of good government as apperteyneth because theie have not any charge but of themselves and of their famylies and

some of them often led by synistre affection to gratify the younger sorte inclyninge to licentiones and contention.

THE ANSWER TO THE SECONDE OBJECTION.

1. We are persuaded that there is no such auncyent statute in the universitie of Cambridge given ether by Pope, legate, or anie subject of this realme whatsoever: but that the Queens Matie uppon good consideracons may by her Maties ryall authoritie alter and chaunge the same notwithstanding the othe of anie that is bounde for the observing of the same, forasmuche as IN OMNI JURAMENTO SEMPER EXCIPIENDA EST POTESTAS MAJORIS, And we do think yt is the duty of every good member of the universitie to procure such statutes as may be moste to Godes his glory and the good government of the present state notwithstanding any olde custome or statute, or els diriges, masses, and other intollerable superstition should as yet have remayned. We marvayle that these men have so forgotten their duties to their prince that they dare object perjury to such men as most humblie seke to her Matie for due and spedie reformation of any wicked disordre and the restrayning of licentiousnesse, whereby great commonweales have not been only corrupted but also overthrowne.

3. This article is for the most parte untrue and very slaunderouse, and we desire that we may have justice against them, in all these twoe yeres there was not put upp by the heades but these, The first yere D. PERNE and DR. WHITEGIFTE and the seconde yere DR. KELKE and DR. WHITEGgifte.

4. The daye howre and place when all the heades are bounde by statute to mete for the nomynatinge of twoe to the Vicech. is appoynted certenly by the said statute and therefor theie maye and are bounde all to be there present. The presidentes are secluded because the moste parte of the Colleges have no certeyn presidentes appoynted and divers that do come in the name of presidentes be as younge and as factiouse as the rest. The rest of this article is untrue.

!

5. There is neither Dr, Bachiller of Divinitie, or Mr of Arte, but he maye be put upp for the Vicechancellorship if he be

thought worthie and mete for that office, neither is there anie thing in the Queene's statutes to the contrary neither hath anie as yet, sithence these statutes, been omytted in his course, and we thinke verely that in shorte tyme we must be compelled to nomynate some other to that office, for the Mrs of Colleges which have had yt be so weary of yt, for the disobedience of this disordered body at this tyme, excepte these promoters of factions may receive due correction that other may attende their studies hereafter with more quyetnesse.

6. This article is very false and slaundersome, and yet if there were anie labor it was only to stopp their subtil and maliciouse practices the which in this last election of the Vicech. was by these two Proctors and others especially devised to make the election frustrate, and so the deluding of the Queene's Maties Statutes. The former contentions and labors were most commonly by factiouse regents for unmeete and unfitt men and for the moste parte the labor and sute contynued halfe a yere before the election with greate spight bitternesse, making of factiouse charges and losse of time which could have been spent in lerninge, which all mouvements nowe are cleane cutt off and the universitie certenly and quyetlie provided of a good offycer.

7. This article is untrew only there was so much offred very honorablie and friendlie by the Lorde North for the great and good will that he bearith to my Lorde Burley and unto the universitie and by the consent of the gentlemen in the country to certeine of the heads of the universitie wherewith theie were content yf my Lorde Burley should like of it and not otherwise neither hath that offer hitherto been confirmed or anie thinge therefore received: but remayneth in the same estate that yt did at the making of the acte.

DE NOMINATIONE LECTORUM BEDELLORUM STATIONARIORUM ETC.

1. Before this statute the Vicechancellor only or the Proctors did nominate the lectors and most commonlie there was great and longe contention betwixt the Vicechancellor and the Proctors for the nomynation of them, nowe every Mr of a College whoe best knowith the worthiest of his companie nameth one and owt of

the whole nombre twoe are chosen by the moste parte of the heades of every lector to be propounded to the regents and nonregents, whereof theie elect one, which theie thinke moste mete and by these meanes the intollerable labor and parciallitie in the preferringe of unmete men and the corruption of officers is taken awaye and besides this the election is ended at one meetinge, which many times before requyred six or seaven scrutinyes and divers congregations for the election of one officer as we have had experience in divers vicech. and proctors tymes, in the which tymes theie could not agree together of anie mete man, until he had received of him so much as theie thought mete

2. There was non of those three persons but were worthie and were allowed both by the heades and the regentes and non regentes. The statute ytselfe is most indifferent and equal, seinge that every Mr may name one whome he know most worthie of his owne colledge, yf it please them to preferr more of one colledge than of another, the Colledge is not to be envied, because yt was at that tyme for the worthynesse of the persons favored more than other, for there was at that tyme three of other Colledges put upp with them whome the universitie might hav chosen if theie had pleased to have thought better of thother then of them, for readinge of those three lecturs.

3. The forme of the electinge of the orator is uppon the foresaide juste considerations brought to the forme of the election of other officers uppon the same considerations, and he that is nowe orator (who is the Capteyne of the headlesse bodie) did shewe himselfe to be chosen by this forme when he was chosen, and if anie offence be made it was for chosinge of him, the rest of the article is untrue.

4. This article arguethe their ignorance in the statutes, for there is a particular statute DE ELECTIONE CANCELLARII.

5. These be but surmyses proceedinge from evil stomackes. As for the open scrutinies theie have been wished by wise men many a daye agoe, as a thing most necessarie for thavoydinge of perjurie or the suspicion of perjurie and untrew dealinge of proctors and scrutators, and the dubble dealinge of divers other persons that give their voyces otherwyse the proctors and scrutators

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