The Philosophy of History: In a Course of Lectures, Delivered at Vienna

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"The most important subject, and the first problem of philosophy, is the restoration in man of the lost image of God; so far as this relates to science. Should this restoration in the internal consciousness be fully understood, and really brought about, the object of pure philosophy is attained. To point out historically in reference to the whole human race, and in the outward conduct and experience of life, the progress of this restoration in the various periods of the world, constitutes the object of the "Philosophy of History." In this way, we shall clearly see how, in the first ages of the world, the original word of Divine revelation formed the firm central point of faith for the future reunion of the dispersed race of man; how later, amid the various power, intellectual as well as political, which, in the middle period of the world, all-ruling nations exerted on their times according to the measure allotted to them, it was alone the power of eternal love in the Christian religion which truly emancipated and redeemed mankind: and how, lastly, the pure light of this Divine truth, universally diffused through the world, and through all science--the term of all Christian hope, and Divine promise, whose fulfilment is reserved for the last period of consummation--crowns in conclusion the progress of this restoration. The following sketch of the subject will show the order of the Lectures, and give a general insight into the plan of the work. The first two Lectures embrace, along with the Introduction, the question of man's relation towards the earth, the division of mankind into several nations, and the two-fold condition of humanity in the primitive world"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).
 

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