Mammals of Colorado, Second Edition

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University Press of Colorado, Dec 21, 2010 - Nature - 620 pages
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Thoroughly revised and updated, Mammals of Colorado, Second Edition is a comprehensive reference on the nine orders and 128 species of Colorado's recent native fauna, detailing each species' description, habitat, distribution, population ecology, diet and foraging, predators and parasites, behavior, reproduction and development, and population status.

An introductory chapter on Colorado's environments, a discussion of the development of the fauna over geologic time, and a brief history of human knowledge of Coloradan mammals provide ecological and evolutionary context. The most recent records of the state's diverse species, rich illustrations (including detailed maps, skull drawings, and photographs), and an extensive bibliography make this book a must-have reference.

Amateur and professional naturalists, students, vertebrate biologists, and ecologists as well as those involved in conservation and wildlife management in Colorado will find value in this comprehensive volume. Co-published with the Denver Museum of Nature & Science
 

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Contents

Environments of Colorado
1
Mammals in General
31
History of Mammals and Mammalogy in Colorado
45
People and Wildlife
65
Order didelphimorphia
91
Order Cingulata
97
Order Primates
103
Order rodentia
107
Order Soricomorpha
279
Order Chiroptera
301
Order Carnivora
347
Order Perissodactyla
437
Order Artiodactyla
443
Appendix A The Metric System
483
Appendix B Glossary
485
Literature Cited
497

Order Lagomorpha
259

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About the author (2010)

James P. Fitzgerald is professor emeritus in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. Carron A. Meaney is senior ecologist at Walsh Environmental Scientists and Engineers and curator adjoint at the University of Colorado Museum. His research interests include bats, prairie dogs, ground squirrels, swift foxes, and badgers. David M. Armstrong is a professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology and environmental studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder, and the former director of the University of Colorado Museum. He is the author or co-author of several books including Rocky Mountain Mammals, Third Edition (UPC), Distribution of Mammals in Colorado and Mammals of the Northern Great Plains.

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