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Address, as worthy the serious attention of those who may have been induced to consider the fubject. The Author of the Address, it seems, has also thought it of contequence enough to merit his notice, and ut. molt endeavour to refute its contents. How far he has succeeded in this attempt, we leave to his impartial Readers to determine, as we cannot afford room for an adequate view of the argument; but we must dilafprove his giving so much way to personal raillery, which hath nothing to do with the points in dispute. The Addresser, and the Counter-Addresser, are both ingenious men; and we could have wished to have seen them treat each o her as GENTLEMEN.

MEDICA L. Art. 30. The young Wife's Guide in the Management of her Chile

dren, &c. &c. By John Theobald, M. D. Author of the Medulla Medicina. 8vo. 1 s. 6d. Kearsly.

Dr. John Theobald, Author of the very Marrow of Medicine, or fome industrious Volunteer, who chufes to be his voluntary Representative, has minced up here an eighteen-penny medical Hash, from a variety of reputable Doctors, which he recommends to the purchase and palate of all young wives, as an indispensable preparative to their becoming mothers. These, as it was intended, muft conftitute a pretty numerous class of Readers ; and when they are informed, that Doctors Boerhaave, Sydenham, Mead, Harris, and many other famous foreign and domestic Physicians, have been taxed to this regale, as many young wives as can read, may feast away; and such as cannot, may be invite ed, we fuppose, to compose an audience. Serioufly, however, there are some very proper directions gleaned up here, for the treatment of infants and young children, in their moit usual maladies ; nor is the Compiler's former good friend, Mr. White, the Trufs-maker in Fleet. ftreet, omitted in this Compiler's cure of ruptures, he being the only perfon and thing prescribed for them.

As mothers are often very uneasy about such eruptions of children, as they imagine deform them, and which some mothers may suppote ta reflect on the constitution, or the cleanliness, of their parents, and thence take fome pains to cure, but oftener do only repel, them, to the frequent injury of their children, it may not be improper to reprint here, the following sensible caution, from Heifter and Brouzet, on this mas terial topic.

Thele Gentlemen say then, on the article of Scabby Eruprions of the Head ard Face, and Running of the Ears, “ The Nurses principal care in these disorders ought to be, to calm the impatience of mothers, who are not easily persuaded to see their children in this condition, as they imagine whatever renders them disagreeable, should be removed as fpeedily as poffible ; but since these disorders are the consequences of a salutary operation, by which Nature endeavours to depurate the Hu. mouis, they should by no means be checked, fince a multitude of fatal examples prove, that the striking in of these eruptions, is almost always mortal. The cure of these eruptions ought to be confined to washing the parts affected with warm water; and a few grains of rhubarb should be given every third day; and the following powders should be given. in any liquid, night and morning, on the intermediate days. Take 4

alkalized

alkalized mercury, and oyster-bells prepared, of each half a drachm, mix them together, and divide them into ten papers, one of which is a dose.”

What Brouzet recommends with regard to rubbing mercurial ointment into children's heads, for killing of vermin there, should be un dertaken with caution by young wives, as well as by good old ones; fince wě have known a considerable salivation excited by rubbing into the scalp, particularly, less than two drachms of it, at different appli. cations. That common one of powdered staves-acre and butter, or ra. ther with pomatum, is fully as effectual, and a fafer application. Art. 31. Pharmacopæia Hippiatrica : or, the Gentleman Farrier's

Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses. In two Books. Containing, I. The Surgical; II. the medical Part of practical Farriery ; with suitable Remarks on the whole. By J. Bartlet, Surgeon, Author of the Gentleman's Farriery. 12mo. 4 s. bound, Eton, printed by Pote, and sold by Nourse, London.

We believe this collection of improved Forins will be very ufeful to every Gentleman who would pay that attention to the health and

preservation of his horse, which every man ought to pay, not only for his own sake, but out of gratitude to the noble, generous, and useful ani. mal, whole life and labours are devoted to the plcasure and service of his matter.

ISCELLANEOUS. Art. 32. A Guide to Classical Learning; or, Polymetis abridged.

In three Parts. 1. The Rise, Growth, and Decay of Poetry, Painting, and Sculpture, among the Romans; with the Characa ters of the Latin Poets, and their Works, from Ennius down to Juvenal

, 2. The Usefulness of Antiques, towards explaining the Classics ; Remarks on our Commentators and School-Education ; with a true Idea of the Allegories and Machinery of the Antients

; the Want of which is the Cause of the Defects and Mistakes in our modern Authors and Artists. 3. A Summary of Mr. Spence's Enquiry concerning the Agreement between the Works of the Roman Poets, and the Remains of the ancient Artists. Being a Work necessary, not only for clasical Instruction, but for all those who wish to have a true Taste

for the

Beauties of Poetry, Sculpture, and Painting. By N. Tindal, Translator of Rapin. 12mo. 3$. Dodsley.

As fome of our Renders are, no doubt, unacquainted with Mr. Spence's Polymetis, we shall lay before them Mr. Tindal's introduction to his abridgment of it, which will serve a double purpose, viz. that of Newing them the nature and design of Mr. Spence's very ingenious and entertaining work, and likewile the use and value of the Compendium now before us.

• Of all the attempts towards explaining the Classics, hitherto extant, the mof useful and instructive is Mr. Spence's Enquiry concerning

the

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Address, as worthy the serious attention of those who may have been induced to consider the subject. The Author of the Address, it seems, has also thought it of contequence enough to merit his notice, and utmost endeavour to refute its contents. How far he has succeeded in this attempt, we leave to his impartial Readers to determine; as we cannot afford room for an adequate view of the argument; but we mult dilafprove his giving so much way to personal raillery, which hath nothing to do with the points in dispute. The Addresler, and the Counter-Addresser, are both ingenious men; and we could have wished to have seen them treat each o her as GENTLEMEN.

MEDICA L. Art. 30. The young Wife's Guide in the Management of her Chile

dren, &c. &c. By John Theobald, M. D. Author of the Medulla Medicine.' 8vo. Is. 6d. Kearsly.

Dr. John Theobald, Author of the very Marrow of Medicine, or fome industrious Volunteer, who chúles to be his voluntary Representative, has minced up here an eighteen-penny medical Halh, from a va. riety of reputable Doctors, which he recommends to the purchase and palate of all young wives, as an indispenable preparative to their becoming mothers. These, as it was intended, muft conftitate a pretty numerous class of Readers ; and when they are informed, that Doctors Boerhaave, Sydenham, Mead, Harris, and many other famous foreign and domestic Physicians, have been taxed to this regale, as many young wives as can read, may feast away; and such as cannot, may be invite ed, we fuppose, to compose an audience. Seriously, however, there are some very proper directions gleaned up here, for the treatment of infants and young children, in their molt usual maladies ; nor is the Compiler's former good friend, Mr. White, the Trufs-maker in Fleet. ftreet, omitted in this Compiler's cure of ruptures, he being the only perfon and thing prescribed for them.

As mothers are often very uneary about such eruptions of children, as they imagine deform them, and which fome mothers may suppose ta reflect on the conftitution, or the cleanliness, of their parents, and thence take fome pains to cure, but oftener do only repel, them, to the frequent injury of their children, it may not be improper to reprint here, the following sensible caution, from Heifter and Brouzet, on this mas terial topic.

Thule Gentlemen fay then, on the article of Scabby Eruptions of the Head and Face, and Running of the Ears, “ The Nurses principal care in these disorders ought to be, to calm the impatience of mothers, who are not easily persuaded to see their children in this condition, as they imagine whatever renders them disagreeable, should be removed as fpeedily as poffible; but since these disorders are the consequences of a falutary operation, by which Nature endeavours to depurate the Hu. mouis, they thould by no means be checked, hince a multitude of fatal examples prove, that the friking in of these eruptions, is almost always mortal. The cure of these eruptions ought to be confined to washing the parts affected with warm water; and a few grains of rhubarb should be given every third day; and the following powders should be given v liquid, night and morning, on the intermediate days. Take

alkalized

alkalized mercury, and oyster-hells prepared, of each half a drachm, mix them together, and divide them into ten papers, one of which is a dore,”

What Brouzet recommends with regard to rabbing mercurial ointment into children's heads, for killing of vermin there, should be undertaken with caution by young wives, as well as by good old ones; fince we have known a considerable salivation excited by rubbing into the scalp, particularly, less than two drachms of it, at different appli. cations. That common one of powdered staves-acre and butter, or ra. ther with pomatum, is fully as effectual, and a fafer application. Art. 31. Pharmacopæia Hippiatrica : or, the Gentleman Farrier',

Repository of elegant and approved Remedies for the Diseases of Horses. In two Books. Containing, I. The Surgical; II. the medical Part of practical Farriery; with suitable Remarks or the whole. By J. Bartlet, Surgeon, Author of the Gentleman's Farriery. 12mo. 4 s. bound, Eton, printed by Pote, and fold by Nourse, London.

We believe this collection of improved Forms will be very ufeful to every Gentleman who would pay that attention to the health and preservation of his horse, which every man ought to pay, not only for his own sake, but out of gratitude to the noble, generous, and useful ani. mal, whose life and labours are devoted to the pleasure and service of his master.

MISCELLANEOUS. Art. 32. A Guide to Clasical Learning; or, Polymetis abridged.

In three Parts. 1. The Rife, Growth, and Decay of Poetry, Painting, and Sculpture, among the Romans; with the Characa ters of the Latin Poets, and their IVorks, from Ennius down to Juvenal, 2. The Usefulness of Antiques, i cwards explaining the Classics ; Remarks on our Commentators and School-Education; with a true Idea of the Allegories and Machinery of the Antients; the Want of which is the Cause of the Defells and Mistakes in our modern Authors and Artists. 3. A Summary of Mr. Spence's Enquiry concerning the Agreement between the Works of the Roman Poets, and the Remains of the ancient Artists. Being a Work necessary, not only for clasical Instruction, but for all those who wijis to have a true Taste

for the Beauties of Poetry, Sculpture, and Painting. By N. Tindal, Translator of Rapin. izmo. 35. Dodney.

As some of our Readers are, no doubt, unacquainted with Mr. Spence's Polymeris, we shall lay belore them Mr. Tindal's introduction to his abridgment of it, which will serve a double purpose, viz. that of fhewing them the nature and design of Mr. Spence's very ingenious and entertaining work, and likewile the use and value of the Compendium now before us.

. Of all the attempts towards explaining the Classics, hitherto extant, the most useful and infructive is Mr. Spence's Enquiry concerning

tba

she Agreement between the Works of the Roman Poets, and the Remains of ibe ancient Artists, published under the title of POLYMETIS.

• The principal design of the Author in this Enquiry was, to compare the descriptions and expressions in the Latin Poets, relating to the Roman Deities, with the allegorical representations of the fame, by the Painters and Sculptors in their pictures, statues, relievos, medals, and gems, in order to illustrate them mutually from one another.

• As the Author has confined himself to the Roman Poets only, and as there is a great deal of difference in the authority of a Poet near the fecond Punic

war, and one of the Augustan age, he was obliged, (in order to settle the degree of credit due to each Poet) to premise an account of the rise, progress, and decay of poetry and the polite arts among the Romans, wherein he gives the characters of all the Poets, and their work's, from Ennius down to Juvenal.

• He hath also subjoined a dissertation upon the uses of such enquiries in general, and of his own in particular. In this dissertation he has made judicious remarks upon our Commentators and school education ; and given a true idea of the allegories of the antients, and of their whole scheme of machinery. The want of this idea is sewn to be the cause of all the mistakes and defects of the modern Poets and Artists in allegorical subjects. Many instances of these defects are produced from Ripa's Iconology-from Horace's Emblems by Veniusfrom the works of Rubens, particularly from his celebrated ceiling in the banquet-house at Whitehall, and his pictures in the Luxembourg gallery at Paris-from Spenser's Fairy Queen-and from Dryden's tranNation of Virgil.--Even the divine Raphael himself is not without his faults, in the allegorical parts of his works,

• The following sheets are a full, tho' concise, abridgment of this valuable treasure of classical learning; in the drawing up of which it is fo managed, that the text may be perused without interruption by the Readers of both sexes, as it contains chiefly the history of the polite arts among the Romans, and the descriptions of the figures, characters, dress, and attributes of their allegorical Deities; whilst the critical remarks, and other less diverting, though not less inftractive, particulars, are thrown into the notes, together with the references to the passages alluded to in the course of the work. These passages could not be inserted át length, consistently with the Abridger's design of reducing the whole within the compass of a small pocket-volume. They are, there. fore, left to be turned to by the young Students, who, by comparing them with what is faid in the text, will receive more light towards the understanding of the Clasics, than by reading over all the Commenta. trs, who gencrally, by their prepolterous notes, rather mislead than inform.

. In short, by ftudying this Compendium, the Reader may learn the sise, growth, and fall of the polite arts among the Romans—the just characters of the Latin Poets, and their works--the figures and other appearances of their Deities-he may gain a true notion of the allegories of the antients, and of their machinery, or the interposition of the Gods---consequently he may acquire a true taste of the beauties of .poetry, painting, and sculpture, and be enabled to judge of the propriety and impropriety of the modern allegories, and the excellencies and de. facts of our Authors, Translators, and Artists.'

Art.

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