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MAYHEw's Remarks on the An

fwer to his Observations; · 396

YNASTON'S. Vindication of Medien on the Baths of Bareges,

Tacitus,

80

196

MEIER's Merry Philosopher, 4301

L.

MEMOIRS of the late Mr. Jack.

fon,

237

Ander's Refidual Analyfis,

of George Psalmanazar,

90

364

LANGTON'S Essay on the Soul,

concluded, 441

414 MERCANT!Le Book keeping; 320

LA TOUCHE on the Stones 357 METHODIST Instructed, 469

Lawson's Tranflation of Apollo- M'Ewen on Grade, &c.

73

nius Pergæus,

259 MINIFIES, Misses, their History of

LEGCE, see Account:

Lady Frances, &e.

74

LELAND, Dr. T. on Eloquence, MODERN Practice of the - London

118 Hofpitals,

474

Letter to, on Do. 305

Universal History, Vol.

LETTER from the Elephant,

74

XLI.

240

to Mr. Pike,

- Vol. XLII. 307

to the Peace-maket; 233 MÔRELL's Contrast, an Epiftle to

to Dr. T. Leland, 305 Churchill,

318

to the Public Advertiser,

- Tales of the Genii,

318

to the Rt. Hon. Charles MOZEEN's Lyrick Packet,

317

Townshend,

397

MUSEUM Rufticum,!?

concerning Epic Poetry,

479

N.

Letters to a Diffenting Mini-

ster,

73

AVIGATION on the Thames

to the Reviewers, 400,

considered,

238

480

Liar, a Comedy,

153

LIFE of William the Conqueror,

BSERVATIONS on divers Para

of Cardinal Pole, 130 fages of Scriptare,

of Judge Jefferys, 238

on Macknight's Har-

LLOYD's Capricious Lovers, 474

mony,

Lowth's Sermon at Durham, 301

on the Account of

Mr. Legge,

473

M.

ORIENTAL Anecdotes, 160

Owen on the Gospels, 49

ACAULAY's History of St.

OXFORD Sausage,

232

Kilda,

79

MACBRIDE's Effays,

288

P.

MACKNIGHT, see Observations.

MAILLARD, on the Rheumatism, Arron, a

153

470

MARCANDIER on Hemp, 159

PPILOSOPHICAL Transactions, Vol.

MARTIN on Quadrille,

238

LIIT.

205

MAYHEW's Defence of his Obser-

continued, 201

vations,

225

concluded; 417

POLE's

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MAILLARD, on the Rheumatifmo PATRON en el nom

Life of Pole, 13

73

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Pole's Life,

130

by Story, 228 Portal's Ode on War, 296

by Richmond, 469 PROCEEDINGS against General

Single, 80, 160, 301, Monckton,

158

320, 400, 480 PSALMANAZAR, fee Memoirs. SMART's Ode to the E. of North

umberland,

231 Q. Soldier, a Poem,

232 SONG of Solomon translated, 161UADRILLE, Treatise on, 238 SOVEREIGN Remedy for Hypo

QUESTION on fome late Dif- crify, Iniflions,

-155 St. Kilda, see M'Aulay.

Stone, Disease, Account of, 3571
R.
STORCK on Saffron,

349 STORY's Sermons,

228 ANDALL's Husbandry, 93 STRONG's Providential History of REDMOND, fee Remarks.: Mankind,

339 Reeves's Hift. of the World, 80 SUGAR-Cane, a Poem,

105 Reid's Enquiry into the Mind, concluded,

I

T.
ReinhaRDÍ On the Gospel, 316
RELIGIO Laici, ::

226 ALBOT on public Worship, REMARKS on Redmond, 472

224 Reply to the Counter Address,233 TEMPTATION, a Poem, 73.

to the Defence of the Ma- Tưxts, see Collection.
,

473 THEOBALD's young Wife's Guide, RESURRECTION, a Poem, 232

234 RETURNS of Spiritual Comfort, TIND AL's Abridgment of Spence's &c.

469
Polymetis,

235 Review of the London Dispensa- Tour of the Duke of York, 319. tory,

251 TRIUMPH of Genius, 398 Richmond's Sermons, 469 True-born Scot,

232 ROBINHOOD Society, History of,

398

V.
Defence of, ibid.
Rogers's Poems,

414

Oltaire's Supplement to Romaine's Life of Faith, 225 his General History, 216 RUFFHEAD's Edition of the Sta

Treatise on Toleration, tutes at large, Vol. VI. 240

241 Vols. VII, and

W.
VIII.

397
ALLET,

74 S.

WARRANTS, &c. see En.

quiry. ATIRE, a Poem, 232 WATKINSON's Admonitions, 224 SATIRICAL Trifles,

232 Welsh Poetry, see Evans. SCHOMBERG on the Colico Picto- WESLEY's Survey of the Creation, num,

182 School of Virtue,

399

WESSELING's new Edition of HeSEASONABLE Alarm to London, rodotus,

461 398 West-India Diseases, Essay on, SERMONS-by Duchal,

248 by Eaton,

WEST.

V

W

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156

278

WEST-India Colonies, Considera- WITHERSPOON's Essays, 469 {tions on,

319 Wynn's Edition of the New TestaWHITEWOOD's Letter to Pike, ment,

401 225 Whitworth’s Succellion of Par

Y. liaments,

79 WILLIAMS's Attempt to restore OUNG Wife's Guide,

234

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148

CONTENTS of the Foreign ARTICLES,

in the APPENDIX to this Volume.

E.

A.

DescRIPT10 novi instrumenti pro cura Cataractæ,

552 ABREGE' Chronologique de l'Hift. DIATRIBE, de Cepotapl.io, &c. de Pologne, 552

547 ALBINUS-Academicarum Annota- Dictionaire Philosophique, 503 tionum Liber fextas, 545 DisserTATION sur la Nature, les

degres de l'Evidence,

556 B.

DISSERTATIO x fur Elie et Enoch, &c.

558 BONNET Contemplations de la Du PAY - Instruction paftorale, Nature, 538 &c.

532 BOURLASGER – Differtation sur

Elie et Epoch, &c. 558 ELEMENTA Metaphyficæ, 550 BUFFOK-Hitoire Naturelle, &c. ENTRETIENS entre un homme du Tom. X. 548 Monde, &c.

553

F.
C.
FERMIN-Traité des Maladies, &c.

530 CASIMIR–Send Schrieben von der FORMEY-Discours Moraux, 552

At:oonz dere: Ainder-b.at. tera,

G. CONTEMPLAT1555 de la Nature, GenovesiElementa Metaphy

538
ficz,

537 COSTES de Gasce Vzdé, 542

H.

HISTOIRE Acgloise de Milord
D.
Feld,

550

I. D'A:2011: Cuscircies Mathe. ISSTRUCTION paforale de Exege 2. TOE III. 549

532 DALCES1-onderzosas las JONCOURT-Oectres diverses,553 le GOTETE de la F:29ce,

557

L. D:B1EC WOT-ict de la LAMELLT-Perfés bar la maniere $15 de rechercher la verité,

555 Dist?915 de jeors L Espios Capris, Gorssan

535 LIITRI: de Cocka jeze, 557

545

da Pay,

558

N.

LINNÆVS-Muszum Reginæ Suz. Rousseau-Lettres écrites de la corum, 549 Montagne,

488 Louis-Memoire sur une queftion anatomique relative a Jurispru.

S. dence,

547

SPECIMEN Hist. Nat, Globi TerM. raquei,

481 MEMOIRE sur une Question ana

T. jomique relative a Jurisprudence,

547 TRATE' des Maladies les plus freMEMOIRES touchant le Gouverne

quentes a Surinam,

530 ment d'Angleteme,

SOI Memoires de Mathematique et

V. de Physique, &c.

Van Goens-Diatribe de Cepotaphio,

552

VANDELLI--Lettera al Sig. dottore NOLLET-Leçons de Physique ex- Carló Gardini,

549 perimentale,

547 'VERHANDELINGEN witgegeeven

door de Hollandsche MaatschapP. py te Haarlem,

555

-De Eigenschappen, ib. PALLUCCI Ratio facilis atque VOLTAIRE—Dictionaire Philosotuta nasium curandi Polypos, phique,

503 546

Lettres Secrettes, 525 Descriptio novi 'inftru

Contes de Guillaume menti pro cura Cataractæ, 547 Vadé,

542 POLOGNE, Abr. Chron. de l'Hita toire de,

552

W. ROLY POS, voyez Pallucci.

.

WITTEVEEN-Verhandelingen oR.

ver de Eigenschappen, 555

WINKELMAN. — Die Geschichte RASPE Spemimen Hift. Nat. &c, der Kunft des alterthumbs, 522

481 RECHERCHES Metaphysiques sur

Z. les Loix du Mouvement, 522 REINHARDT-Recherches' Meta. ZIMMERMAN — de l'Experience physiques, &c.

522
en Medicine,

551 ROSELLE-Lettres de,

515

THE

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A

Conclusion of the Account of an Inquiry into the Human Mind, on

the Principles of Common Sense. Great part of what Dr. Reid has advanced, concerning

the sense of Smelling, (of which we gave a full account in our Review for May) is to easily applied to those of Tasting and Hearing, that he saves his keaders the trouble of a tedious repetition, and leaves the application entirely to their own judgments. He introduces what he says concerning Touch, with observing, that the senses, already considered, are very simple and uniform, each of them exhibiting only one kind of sensation, and thereby indicating only one quality of bodies. By the ear we perceive sounds, and nothing elie; by the palate, tastes; and by the nose, odours: these qualities are all likewise of one order, being all secondary qualities : whereas by touch we perceive not one quality only, but many, and those of very different kinds. The chief of them are heat and cold, hardness and softness, roughness and smoothness, figure, solidity, motion, and cxtension. These our Author considers in order.

As to heat and cold, it will eafily be allowed, that they are secondary qualities, of the same order with smell, taste, and found. And, therefore, what has been said of smell, is easily applicable to them; that is, that the words heat and cold have each of them two significations; they sometimes signify certain sensations of the mind, which can have no existence when they are not felt, nor can exist any where but in a mind, or sentient being; but more frequently they fignify a quality in bodies, which, by the laws of nature, occasions the sensations of heat and cold in us : a quality which, though connected by custom fo closely with the sensation, that we cannot without difficulty Vol. XXXI,

B

separate

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