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Advice to a Lady in Autumn. (Philip, Earl of

Chesterfield)

35

A Letter of Advice.' (Winthrop Mackworth

37

“Fair Amoret is Gone Astray." (William Congrevej 40

Phyllida, That Loved to Dream.” (John Gay) 41

On a Woman of Fashion. (Thomas Tickell)

42

The Jilt. (James Smith)

44

Dixit

, et in Mensam. (Charles Shirley Brooks) 45

An Epitaph. (George John Cayley)

47

Madame la Marquise. (Robert, Lord Lytton)

47

Avice. (Austin Dobson).

49

Beauty Clare. (Hamilton Aïdé)

A Musical Box. (W. W. Story)

Epistle from Lord Boringdon to Lord Granville.

(Right Hon. George Canning)

57

Little Laurette. (Mortimer Collins).

59

A Legend of the Divorce Court. (Mortimer Collins) 60

A Comedy. (J. Ashby Sterry).

62

At Home. (Thomas. Haynes Bayly)

64

Not at Home. (Thomas Haynes Bayly):

65

“My Husband Neans Extremely Weli.” (Thomas

Haynes Bayly)

.66

No Longer Jealous. (Walter Savage Landor).

Mamma. (H. B. Freeman)

68

“This is my Eldest Daughter.” (Thomas Haynes

Bayly).

70

The Archery Meeting. (Thomas Haynes Bayly) 72

The Female Phaeton. (Matthew Prior).

73

I Must Come out Next Spring.” (Thomas Haynes

Bayly) :

My Neighbour Rose. (Frederick Locker)

75

Rejected Addresses." (H. Cholmondeley Pennell). 78

The Talented Man. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed). 80

The Dashing Young Fellow. (William Macquorn

Rankine)

82

The Handsomest Man in the Room. (William

Macquorn Rankine)

84

Anticipation. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed) 86

A Nice Correspondent. (Frederick Locker)

87

Epitaph on a Tuft-Hunter. (Thomas Moore) :

"Why Don't the Men Propose?” (Thomas Haynes

90

"Don't Talk of September.; (Thomas Haynes

Bayly).

91

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“The Men are all Clubbing Together.” (Thomas

Haynes Bayly)

93

Love at a Rout.' (Winthrop Mackworth Praed) 94

Elegy on the Abrogation of the Birth-Night Ball.

(Catherine Fanshawe).

The Belle of the Ball-Room. (Winthrop Mackworth

Praed)

My Partner. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed)

104

Our Ball. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed)

107

The Fancy Ball. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed)

Good Night. (Edward Fitzgerald)

114

“Yes, I Write Verses Now and Then." (Walter

Savage Landor).

116

Tu Quoque. (Austin Dobson)

117

Le Roman de la Rose. (Austin Dobson)

119

A. B. C. (Charles Stuart Calverley)

Aged Forty. (Edmund Yates)

The Romance of a Glove. (H. Savile Clarke)

124

The Best of the Ball. (William Sawyer)

126

Without and Within. (J. Russell Lowell)

127

At the Opera-Faust. (William Sawyer)

129

The University Boat Race. (Mortimer Collins) 131

The Impartial. (J. Ashby Sterry)

132

My Shilling Photograph. (H. B. Freeman)

133

Private Theatricals. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed).

Clubs. (Theodore Hook)

137

At Hurlingham. (Frederick Locker)

140

Croquet. (H. Cholmondeley Pennell)

141

A Billiard Lesson. (H. Savile Clarke).

146

In the Royal Academy. (Austin Dobson)

147

Portrait of a Lady. (Winthrop Mackworth Praed). 150

Number One., (J. Ashby Sterry)

154

To my Grandmother. (Frederick Locker)

“What is London's Last New Lion?” (Thomas

Haynes Bayly)

159

To a Lady on her Passion for old China. (John

Gay)

160

China versus Chippendale. (j. Jemmett-Browne) 162

164

A Blenheim's Valentine. (William John Courthope).

165

Ode. (Catherine Fanshawe).

168

To Lady Carteret. (Jonathan Swift)

171

An Answer. (Dr. Sheridan).

171

Good Night to the Season. (Winthrop Mackworth

Praed)

172

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HERE has hitherto, I think, been some

confusion as to the exact meaning and limitation to be given to “ Society

verse.” That dubious term has been assigned indiscriminately to everything in the way of verse that is not either broadly humorous or highly imaginative in character. It has been obvious to everybody that between such poems as Shelley's

Skylark” on the one hand, and Wolcot's “Odes” on the other, there is a great gulf fixed; and to all verse which occupies the tremendous interval the description of vers de société has been applied. It seems to me that the definition is by far too rough and ready, and by no means sufficiently accurate. There is surely a very manifest difference between such poems as Praed's “Our Ball” and Locker's 66 Hurlingham” on the one side, and Brough's “ Neighbour Nelly” and Peacock's “ Rich and Pooron the other. Yet all four pieces are popularly included under the one description of “Society verse;" the word "Society," I suppose, being used to indicate the freedom of such pieces alike from the coarseness of unmitigated fun and the elevation of undiluted fancy.

Much would be gained, I believe, if we revised

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