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p. 156,

NEWES, sb. Used as a plural. E. xv. p. 54, 1. 14.
NEW MEN, sb. Like the Lat. novi homines, men who have

newly acquired rank. We are obliged to resort to the Fr.

parvenu to express this. E. ix. p. 30, l. 25. NICE, adj. Scrupulous. E. xxix. p. 123, 1.

30,

xxxvii. 1. 15. NICENESSE, sb. Fastidiousness. E. ii. p. 6, 1. 16. NOBLESSE, sb. Nobility. E. xv. p. 60, l. 16. NOTABLE, adj. Remarkable. E. liii. p. 215, 1.

3. NOTABLY, adv. Notoriously, remarkably. E. xv. p. 60, l. 2,

xxix. p. 121, 1. 29. NOTE, sb. Observation. E. ix. p. 31, 25.

Information. E. xlix. p. 202, l. 24. NOTHING NEARE. E. xxi. p. 89, 1. 18.

WORTH. C. 10. p. 265, 1. 12. NOV'ÉLTIES, sb. Innovations. E. xvii. p. 69, 1. 25. NOURISH, v. i. To receive nourishment. E. xix. p. 80, l. 24.

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OBIECT, p.p. Exposed. C. 5. p. 254, 1. 8.
OBLIGED, P.p. Bound. E. xx. p. 82, l. 7.
OBNOXIOUS TO. Exposed to, under the influence of; and

hence, submissive, complaisant. E. xx. p. 86, l. 12, xxxvi.

p. 155, 1. 3, xliv. p. 179, 1. 16. OBTAINE, v. i. To attain; to gain a cause in law. E. vi. p. 19,

1. 2, lvi. p. 225, 1. 13. OES, số. Round bright spots. E. xxxvii. p. 157, 1. 17. Used by Shakspere of the stars (Mid. N.'s Dr. ii. 2):

Fair Helena, that more engilds the night

Than all yon fiery oes and eyes of light.
OF. E. vi. p. 19, 1. 10, p. 22, l. 2, xvii. p. 69, 1. 21, xix. p. 79,

1. 31, xxv. p. 102, l. 28, xxvii. p. 109, l. 34, xxx, p. 131, 1. 3,
xxxv. P. 151, l. 31, li. p. 208, l. 29, liii. p. 214,
p. 249, 1. 24. In all these passages of' would be replaced
in modern usage by other prepositions, which the reader
will easily supply. In a partitive sense.

E. xxxiii. p. 142, 1. 32, xvi. p. 65, 1. 18. Of either side. E. xlvi. p. 189, 1. 29. of long. E. Ivi. p. 224, 1. 4. Of purpose. E. ix. p. 33,

Of the other side. Č. 2. p. 249, 1. 10. OFFER, sb. An attempt. C. 10. p. 266, l. 16. OFFICIOUS, adj. Ready to serve, like the Lat. officiosus;

not in a bad sense. E. xlviii. p. 199, 1. 27. OFT, adv. Often. C. 1. p. 248, 1. 4, 2. p. 248, I, 18. E. ii. p. 6, 1. 21, viii. p. 27, 1.

p. 142, 1. 32. OPINIÓN, sb. Reputation. E. xxvi. p. 105,

1.
30,
liv.

p. 217, 1. 9. ORACULOUS, adj. Oracular. E. vi. p. 20, 1. 34.

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I.

C. 3;

1. 17

27, xxxii.

1. 13

ORANGE-TAWNEY, adj. Of a dark orange colour. In

Knight's Shakspere (11. p. 250) it is said, Vecellio, a Venetian, “expressly informs us that the Jews differed in nothing, as far as regarded dress, from Venetians of the same professions, whether merchants, artisans, &c., with the exception of a yellow bonnet, which they were compelled to wear by order of the government." See also Sir W. Scott's description of Isaac of York in Ivanhoe, c. 5: “He wore a high square yellow cap. of a peculiar fashion, assigned to his

nation to distinguish them from Christians.” E. xli. p. 168, ORDER, TO TAKE. To take measures.

E. xxxvi. P. 153, 1. 20. ORDERING, sb. Arrangement. E. xlvi. p. 186, 1. 10, p. 190,

1. 32. lviii, p. 237, 1. 33. OTHER, pl. "Others. E. viii. p. 26, l. 15, xxiv. p. 100, 1.

13. OVERCOME, v. t. In the phrase "to overcomie a bargain,' to master it, and make it one's own. E. xxxiv.

15. OVERGREATNESSE, sb. Excessive greatness. E. xx. p. 85,

1. 16. OVER-LIVE, v. t. To survive. E. xxvii. p. 109, 1.

31. OVER-POWER, sb. Excessive power. E. lviii. p. 236, 1. 17. OVER-SPEAKING, adj. Speaking too much. È. lvi. p. 224, OVERTHROWEN, P. P. Overthrown. E. xv. p. 56, I. 2. OYNTMENT, sb. Perfume. E. liii. p. 213, l. 19.

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1. 17.

P.

PACE, v. i. To proceed. E. xxxiv. p. 145, 1. 20.
PAIRÉ, v. t. To impair. E. xxiv. p. 100, 1. 13.
PALME, sb. A handbreadth. E. xix. p. 78, 1. 1.
PARABLE, sb. A proverb. E. xxvii. p. 110, I. 22.
PARDON, sb. Permission. E. xliii. p. 177, l. 20.
PART, sb. Party. E. xvi. p. 66, 1. 13.
PARTÍCULAR, adj. Partial. E. lviii. p. 231, 1, 22.

sb. Used as a substantive, like 'private,' &c.
E. xy. p. 61, 1. 34.
PASS, v.t. To surpass. F. p. 239, 1. 14.
PASSAGES, sb. Digressions. E. xxv. p. 102, 1. 25.
PASSING, adv. Surpassingly, exceedingly. E. vi. p. 19, 1. 13.
PASTURAGES, sb. Pastures. E. xv. p. 60, l. 13.
PAWNES, sb. Pledges. E. xli. p. 170, 1. 17.
PEECE, v. i. To fit. E. xxiv. p. 99, 1. 21.
PENURY, sb. Want. E. xxix. p. 123, 1. 17.
PENYWORTH, sb. A purchase. C. 9. p. 264, 1. 3.
PERCASE, adv. Perhaps. C. 3. p. 250, 1. 7.
PERCEIVING, sb. Perception. È. liii. p. 213, 1, 11,

men."

P. 188, 1.

PEREMPTORY, adj. In its literal sense of deadly, destruc

tive. E. xv. p. 61, 1. 19.
PERIOD, sb. Termination, completion. E. xlii. p. 174, 1. 23.
PERISH, v. t. To destroy. E. xxvii. p. 110, l. 18.
PERSONAGE, sb. A representation of the human face.

E. xliii. p. 177, l. 4, 6.
PERSUADE, v.t. To recommend. E. iii. p. 13,

1.

32. PHANTASME, sb. A phantom. E. xxxv. p. 150, 1. 8. PINCK, sb. The blush Pincke' is merely a variety of the

common Pink. E. xlvi. p. 187, 1. 18. The matted Pinck' is called by Parkinson (Paradisus, p. 316, ed. 1629) Caryophyllus minor repens, and is described as “the smallest, both for leafe and ficwer of all other Pinkes that are nourished in Gardens.” The same Latin name is given by Ray to the Maiden Pink, Dianthus deltoides. In the 2nd edition of Gerarde, Parkinson's plate is copied, and the flower is called C. virgineus. Miller (Gard. Dict. 7th ed. 1759) describes a kind of Dianthus as “the small creeping or Maiden Pink, commonly called the mated Pink by seeds

He afterwards says it was used for the edgings of borders. I cannot identify it. E. xlvi.

32. PINE-APPLE-TREE, sb. The Pine. E. xlvi. p. 186, 1. 17. PITIE, sb. Used like 'reason for the corresponding adjec

tive. E. xli. p. 168, 1. 2. PLACE, sb. Topic. F. p. 240, 1. 6. TAKE. To have effect. E. xxxi. p. 134, 1.

II, xlix. p. 202, l. 21. PLACED, p.p. Put in place, or position. E. xi. p. 42, l. 10,

li. p. 208, l. 20.
PLACING, sb. Position. E. lviii. p. 233, l. 16.
PLAIE-PLEASURE, sb. E. ix. p. 30, 1.

17.
PLANT, v. t. To colonize. E. xxxiii. p. 139, 1. 22.
PLANTATION, sb. Colony. E. xxxiii.
PLASH, sb. A pool, or puddle. . C. 4. p. 251, l. 11.
PLATFORM, sb. Plan. E. xlvi. p. 194.

1.

25. PLAUSIBLE, adj. Praiseworthy, deserving applause. E. ix.

p. 34, 1. 26, xv. p. 55, l. 12. In lvi. p. 222, 1. 11, it seems to mean 'courting applause,' and so approaches to the modern

sense.
PLEASURING, pr.P: Pleasing. E. xxxvi. p. 154, 1.

27:
PLENTIFUL, adj. Lavish. E. xxviii. p. 117, 1. 6.
PLIE, sb. Bend, twist. E. xxxix. p. 164, 1. 3.
POESY, sb. Poetry. E. i. p. 2, 1. 18, v. p. 16, 1.

14.
C.

9. p. 264, l. 9. POINT, v. t. To appoint. E. xlv. p. 183, 1. 2, lviii p. 237, l. 26. POINT DEVICE, adj. Exact. E. lii. p. 212, l. 8. POLER, sb. An exacter of fees. E. lvi. p. 226, 1. 17. POLING, adj. Exacting. E. lvi. p. 226, 1. 2. POLITICKÉS, sb. Politicians. E. iii. p. 9, l. 31, vi.

p. 18, 1. 5. POLITIQUE, sb.. A politician. E. xiii. p. 49, 1. 28.

adj. “The Politique Body, the body politic, or state. E. xii. p. 45, 1. 12. Politique Ministers, or Ministers of State.

E. xxix. p. 127, 1. 6. Politique persons = politicians. E. ix. p. 32, 1. 30.

over.

POLL, sb. Head; whence 'poll,' a reckoning or census of

heads. E. xxix. p. 122, l. 15. POPULAR, adj. Democratic. E. xii. p. 45, 1. 5. POPULARITIE, sb. A courting of popular favour. E. xlviii.

p. 199, I. 11. POPULARITIES, sb. Popular representations. Pref. to

Colours, p. 245 PORTRAITURE, sb. Portrait. E. xiii. p. 49, l. I. POSER, sb. An examiner, who poses or puts questions. Still

in use at Eton and Winchester. E. xxxii. p. 137, l. 19. POWER, sb. 'To have power with' is 'to have influence

E. xxvii. p. 198, 1. 33. PRACTISE, PRACTIŽE, sb. Plot, plotting. E. iii. p. 12,

1. 19, xxii. p. 91, 1. 15, xlvii. p. 196, 1. 25. PRAY (IN AID. To call in as an advocate. Comp. Adv. of

L. II. 17, § 9: "For it is a Rule, that whatsoeuer Science is
not consonant to presuppositions, must pray in ayde of

Similitudes.” E. xxvii. p. 111, 1. 6.
PRECEDENT, adj. Preceding, previous. E. xix. P. 78, 1.

13. PRECISELY, adv. With precision, exactness. E. xli. p. 170,

1. 18. PREDICTIONS, sb. Prognostics. E. xv. p. 56, 1. 33. PREDIGESTION, sb. Premature digestion. E. xxv. p. 101, PREDOMINANCIE, ső. Predominance. C. 7. p. 259, 1. 5.

E. xxxix. p. 163, 1. 2. PREFER BEFORE. To make superior to, promote above.

E. xxiii. p. 97, 1. 7. Comp. Esth. ii. 9. PREHEMINENCE, sb. Rank. E. ix. p. 33, 1. 7. PREOCCUPATE, v. t. To anticipate. E. ii. p. 6, 1. 11. PRESCRIPTION, sb. Title, claim. E. xlvii. p. 196, 1. 12. PRESENCE, CHAMBER OF. Reception room. E. xlv.

p. 183, 1. 28. PRÉSENT, AT THIS. At the present time, now. E. xliv.

p. 179, 1. 14. PRÉSENTLY, adv. Immediately. E. xli. p. 170, l. 7. Comp.

1 Sam. ii. 16; Matt. xxvi. 53.
PRESIDENTS, sb. Precedents. E. xi. p. 41, 1.
PRESS, v. t. To press upon, oppress. E. xiv. p. 52, l. 2.
PRESSED, P.p. 'Urged, enforced. E. xix. p. 76, 1.

30,

Ivi. P. 224, 1. 2. PRÉST, adj. Ready. E. xxix: p. 127, 1. 8. PRETEND, v. t. To put forward as a pretext. E. xxiv. p. 100, l. 21.

v.i. To make pretension. E. xxxii. p. 138, 1. 3. PREVÃIL, v. i. To succeed. E. xlvii. p. 196, 1. 9. PREVENT, v. t. To anticipate. E. lvi. p. 224, 1. 23. Comp.

· Ps. cxix. 148. PRICE, sb. Value. C. 5. p. 256, 1. 10, 9. p. 264, 1. 13. Comp.

Prov. xxxi. 10; Matt. xiii. 46. PRICK, v. t. To set, plant. 'E. xviii. p. 74, 1. 7, xlvi. p. 193,

1. 9.

10, xxiv.

p. 99, 1. 6.

P. 126, 1. 8.

PRIME, sb. E. lviii. p. 233, I. 27. See the passage itself.
PRIME, adj. Best.

E. xxxiv. p. 146, 1. 15.
PRIMUM MOBILE. E. xv. p. 56, 1. 18, li. p. 209,

1.

17. See note on p. 56. PRINCIPIALL, adj; Initial. . E. xxxv. p. 151, 1. 6. PRIVADOES, sb. Intimate friends, favorites. The Duchess

of Burgundy, after instructing Perkin Warbeck in his part, “sent him unknowne into Portugall, with the Lady Brampton, an English Ladie, that embarqued for Portugall at that time; with some Privado of her owne to haue an eye upon

him.” Hist. of Hen. 7, p. 117, ed. 1622. E. xxvii. p. 108, 1. 7. PRIVATE, sb. Used as a substantive. Comp. B. Jonson,

Sejanus, iii. 1: "My Lord, this strikes at every Roman's

private. E. xxxii. p. 141, 1. 6. PRIVATENESSE, sb. Privacy. E. xi. p. 39, l. 18. PRIVIE, adj. Private. E. xlv. p. 184, 1. 29. PROCEEDING, sb. Course of action, policy. E. xv. p. 61,

1. 16, p. 62, l. 10. PROFIT, v.i. To make progress. E. xlii, p. 175. 1. 7, xxix. PROPER, adj. Peculiar. E. vii. p. 23, 1. 9. Personal. E. xxvii. p. 115,

1.

Ivii. p. 230, 1.9. PROPOUND, v. t. To propose. C. 4. p. 251, l. 13. PROPRIETY, sb. Property, peculiarity. E. iii. p. 9, 1. 14. PROSPECTIVE, sb. Perspective glasses, which were appa

rently used to produce the same solid appearance as the modern stereoscope. E. xxvi. p. 104, l. 13. Chaucer, Squire's Tale, 10548:

They speak of Alhazen and Vitilyon

And Aristotle, that writen in her lyves

Of queynte myrrours and prospectyves." PROYNING, . Pruning. E. I. p. 204, 1. 16. PULING, sb. A whining. E. xxxvii. p. 157, 1. 13. PURCHASE, v. t. To acquire, procure. E. iv. p. 14, l. 16. lv. p. 219, 1. 12.

sb. Acquisition. C. 9. p. 263, 1. 7. PURPOSE, OF. Purposely. E. ix. p. 33, 1. 18.

HAD A. Purposed. F. p. 241, l. 4.

HAD IN. Purposed. F. p. 240, 1. 18. PURPRISE, sb. An inclosure, precinct." E. Ivi. p. 225, 1.

30. PUT ABROAD. Spread out. E. xxvii. p. III, 1. 33. PUT UP. To offer as a prayer. E. xxxix. p. 163, I. 18. PUTRIFIE, v. t. To corrupt. E. xlix. p. 201, I. 2. PYTHONISSA, sb. A woman possessed with the spirit of

Python, or divination. See note. E. xxxv. P. 149, 1. 5.

15,

Q. QUADLINS, sb. Codlings. E. xlvi. P. 187, 1. 29. QUALITIE, sb. Rank, E. xv. p. 59, l. 17, liii. p. 213, I. 15. QUARRELL, sb. Lit. a cause of complaint; hence any cause

E. vis. p. 28, 1. 5, xxix. p. 126, 1. 30.

or reason.

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