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TO TEACHERS.

IN ARTICULATION, as the exercises are already extensive, a few lessons only are added, especially adapted to the purpose of practice.

The INFLECTIONS marked are in accordance with the best authorities, both American and English, among whom may be mentioned SHERIDAN KNOWLES as a leading and standard author on this subject. At the same time, it must be remembered, that, in many cases, inflections depend upon the degree of emphasis, and, on this point, opinions and tastes may vary in different individuals, and sometimes in the same individual at different times. It is also to be noticed, that the rising inflection is often used in a slight degree without being discerned except by an acute and educated ear; pupils learn to distinguish it with great difficulty, and teachers frequently do not perceive it, unless under emphasis.

In EMPHASIS and POETRY, the lessons for practice include all the previous notation.

With regard to the lessons on MODULATION, a single remark seems necessary.

The tone and manner in which emotion is expressed, are instinctive. A proper expression can be given, only by imbibing the spirit of the subject. In the notation, high and low tones are specifically indicated. Loudness is sufficiently denoted in most cases, by emphasis.

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The subjoined characters are used in the following pages:
THE RISING INFLECTION IS DENOTED BY .
THE FALLING INFLECTION
THE RISING CIRCUMFLEX
THE FALLING CIRCUMFLEX
THE MONOTONE, BY A LINE PLACED OVER TIE VOWEL
EMPHATIC WORDS ARE DENOTED BY ITALICS OR CAPITALS.
THE EMPHATIC PAUSE, BY A LINE BEFORE OR AFTER THE WORD
THE CESURA IS DENOTED BY

(ID THE DEMI-CESURA 16

() A HIGH TONE

(h) A HIGHER TONE

(hh) A LOW TONE

(2) A LOWER TONE

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NEW SIXTH READER.

EXERCISES IN ARTICULATION.

The first five of the following Exercises are intended especially for practice in Articulation, and are earnestly commended to the Teacher's attention.

EXERCISE 1.—THE GROTTO OF ANTIPAROS.

FROM GOLDSMITI. OLIVER GOLDSMITH was born in Ireland, in 1728. After his graduation at the Dublin University, he went to London, to seek support by his pen; and during the greater part of his life, worked as a mere compiler for the book-sellers. His poems of The Traveler" and The Deserted Village,established his fame. He died in 1774.

1. Archipelago; (pro. Ark-e-pel'-a-go,) a narrow sea bordering on Greece, and containing many small islands.

2. Levantine; the eastern part of the Mediterranean sea is called the Levant, and a Levantine mariner is a seainan of that region.

1. Of all the subterraneous caverns now known, the grotto of Antiparos is the most remarkable, as well for its extent as for the beauty of its sparry incrustations. This celebrated cavern was first explored by one Magni, an Italian traveler, about one hundred years ago, at Antiparos, an inconsiderable island of the Archipelago.

2. “Having been informed," says he, " by the natives of Paros, that, in the little island of Antiparos, which lies about two miles from the former, a gigantic statue was to be seen at the mouth of a cavern in that place, it was resolved that we (the French consul and himself) should pay it a visit.

3. “In pursuance of this resolution, after we had landed on the island, and walked about four miles through the midst of beautiful plains and sloping woodlands, we at length came to a little hill, on the side of which yawned a most horrid cavern, which, by its gloom, at first struck us with terror, and almost repressed curiosity. Recovering from the first surprise, however, we entered boldly, and had not proceeded above twenty paces, when the supposed statue of the giant presented itself to view.

4. “We quickly perceived that what the ignorant natives had been terrified at as a giant, was nothing more than a sparry concretion, formed by the water dropping from the roof of the cave, and by degrees hardening into a figure, which their fears had formed into a monster. Incited by this extraordinary appearance, we were induced to proceed still further, in quest of new adventures, in this subterranean abode.

5. “As we proceeded, new wonders offered themselves; the spars, formed into trees and shrubs, presented a kind of petrified grove; some white, some green; and all receding in due perspective. They struck us with the more amazement, as we knew them to be mere productions of Nature, who, hitherto in solitude, had, in her playful moments, dressed the scene as if for her own amusement.

6. “We had as yet seen but a few of the wonders of the place; and we were introduced only into the portico of this amazing temple. In one corner of this half-illuminated recess, there appeared an opening about three feet wide, which seemed to lead to a place totally dark, and which one of the natives assured us contained nothing more than a reservoir of water.

7. “Upon this information, we made an experiment, by throwing down some stones, which rumbled along the sides of the descent for some time: the sound seemed at last quashed in a bed of water. In order, however, to be more certain, we sent in a Levantine mariner, who, by the promise of a good reward, ventured, with a flambeau in his hand, into this narrow aperture.

8. “After continuing within it for about a quarter of an hour, he returned, bearing in his hand some beautiful pieces of white spar, which art could neither equal nor imitate. Upon being informed by him that the place was full of these beautiful incrustations, I ventured in with him, about fifty paces, anxiously and cautiously descending, by a steep and dangerous way.

9. 16

Finding, however, that we came to a precipice which led into a spacious amphitheater, (if I may so call it,) still deeper than any other part, we returûed, and being provided with a ladder, flambeau, and other things to expedite our descent, our whole company, man by man, ventured into the same opening; and, descending one after another, we at last saw ourselves all together in the most magnificent part of the cavern.

10. “Our candles being now all lighted up, and the whole place completely illuminated, never could the eye be presented with a more glittering or a more magnificent scene; the whole roof hung with solid icicles, transparent as glass, yet solid as marble.

11. “The eye could scarcely reach the lofty and noble ceiling; the sides were regularly formed with spars; and the whole presented the idea of a magnificent theater, illuminated with an immense profusion of lights. The floor consisted of solid marble; and, in several places, magnificent columns, thrones, altars, and other objects, appeared, as if nature had designed to mock the curiosities of art.

12. “Our voices, upon speaking or singing, were redoubled, to an astonishing loudness; and upon the firing of a gun, the noise and reverberations were almost deafening. In the midst of this grand amphitheater, rose a concretion about fifteen feet high, that, in some measure, resembled an altar; from which, taking the hint, we caused mass to be celebrated there. The beautiful columns that shot up around the altar appeared like candlesticks; and many other natural objects represented the customary ornaments of this rite.

13. “Below even this spacious grotto, there seemed another cavern; down which I ventured with my former mariner, and descended about fifty paces, by means of a rope. I at last arrived at a small spot of level ground, where the bottom appeared different from that of the amphitheater, being composed of soft clay, yielding to the pressure, and in which I thrust a stick to the depth of six feet.

In this, however, as above, numbers of the most beautiful crystals were formed; one of which, particularly, resembled a table. Upon our egress from this amazing cavern, we perceived a Greek inscription upon a rock at the mouth,

14. "

but so obliterated by time that we could not read it distinctly. It seems to import that one Antipater, in the time of Alexander, had come hither; but whether he penetrated into the depths of the cavern, he does not see fit to inform us. This account of so beautiful and striking a scene may serve to give us some idea of the subterrancous wonders of nature.

II.—THE THUNDER-STORM.

FROM THosson. JAMES THOMSox was born in Scotland, in 1700. His fame rests chiefly on the poem of “ The Seasons,” which will ever be popular tirough its vivid descriptions of natural scenery. He died at Kew, in 1748. 1. As from the face of heaven the shattered clouds

Tumultuous rove, the interminable sky
Sublimer swells, and o'er the world expands
A purer azure.

2.

Through the lightened air
A higher luster and a clearer calm,
Diffusive, tremble; while, as if in sign
Of danger past, a glittering robe of joy,
Set off abundant by the yellow ray,
Invests the fields; and nature smiles revived.

3.

'T is beauty all, and grateful song around,
Joined to the low of kine, and numerous bleat
Of flocks thick-nibbling through the clovered vale;
And shall the hymn be marred by thankless man,
Most favored; who, with voice articulate,
Should lead the chorus of this lower world?

4.

Shall man, so soon forgetful of the Hand
That hushed the thunder, and serenes the sky,
Extinguished feel that spark the tempest waked,
That sense of powers, exceeding far his own,
Ere yet his feeble heart has lost its fears ?

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