Page images
PDF
EPUB
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

96

וון

[ocr errors]

...

ESSAYS.

Page.
Map of our Journey

1
Irish History,

4
Historic Memory in Ireland

7
The New Era,"and the OldPaths" 17, 81
How the Women of a Country

can Influence its Destiny 33, 49, 97
What's in a Name

90
Dress

104
The Celtic Race

113, 129
Thoughts on the Early Develop-
ment of Society

137
Knowledge and Virtue 140, 157
Ireland's Temptations, Failings,
and Vices

145, 177, 193, 308
The Songs of Beranger 147, 109, 209
Old Sports and Pastimes

151
A Plague Spot

154
The Irish Names which occur in
Cæsar

161
The Peasantry

174
Past Memories

194
Shopping

223
The Songs of Ireland

717
L'Inde Anglaise

227
English Books, and Irish Readers
Servants

254
History of the Invasion of Ireland
by the Anglo-Normans

256
National Spirit

269
Race

273, 303, 312
Our Present Condition

296
Happy Christmas

342
A Gentleman of the Small School 347
Defence of England and Ireland 359
Address of the Committee

362

...

[ocr errors]

...

207,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

232

Page.
Lines to C. ...
The Emblems of Ireland
An Exile's Death

118
Gentle Brideen

127
The Trial. (A '48 Scene)

134
My Native Land

139
Erin

ib.
Lament for Owen Roe O'Neil

141
The Well of the Omen

146
The Absentee

157
The Reply of Shane the Proud

159
Ballynetty

167
O'More's Lament

172
A Nation's Tear and Prayer

175
Address to the Irish after the Clare
Election

183
Machine Poetry, Manufactured by
Steam

188, 206
Birth-day Lessons

190
In Memoriam

191
The Children of Sigir

200
The Lady Love

217
My Own Land

221
Far out at Sea

232
Elgin a Haza

39
The Banks and the Woods of the Lee 249
The Legend of the Seven Sisters 253
A Picture

256
The Heroines of Limerick ... 262
Rory of the Hill

278
The Penitent

286
Despondency and Hope

293
The Idiot Boy

303
The Cailleach Ruadh

310
Bruce's Grave

315
A True Tale

319
Love in the Country. (A Carol) 326
End of the Just

335
Exiles

34)
Battle of the Curlew Mountains 316
Outcasts

358
HISTORICAL AND NATIONAL

TALES.
Relics of Old Readings and Gossipings-
No. 1, The Professor and his Pupil 126
No. 2, Vengeance and Grace 179, 197
No. 3, The Wild Geese

241
No. 4, Bloody Reprisals

299
No. 5, Retribution or Priest-worry-
ing

281
No. 6, Rage and Repentance

354

...

...

[ocr errors]

...

POETRY
Legend of St. Barry's
Origin of the Moss Rose
Munster War Song
Ad Vincula
The Felons of '48
The Yankee in Dublin
Sonnet
Trabulgan
Willy Brand
Tho Priest and his People
Felix Mac Donnell's Welcome to

5
21
29
35
51
74
78
88
91
94

...

Glenflesk
A Story.--By an Irish Wife
Am ufu

103
107

...

[blocks in formation]

Page,
A Cool Glance at a Picturesque Fire 32
Unacknowledged Legislators

62
Thoughts of a Deep Thinker
Object and Aim of Art

ib.
Carnot's Letter to Napoleon

22
A Sad True Story and a Contrast 68
A Foreigner's Judgment of Eng.
land

72
Materials for a Nation

ib.
Defence of the Tyrol

77
Latent Horor in a Detective

92
The Second Sight of Genius

95
The Coming Man

106
Description of Ireland's Nation.
ality

108
Notions of Royalty

111
Fellow Feeling

170
The Infidel Frederick the Great
Reproved by a Christian Soldier

171
An Exile's Last Glimpse of Home 189
A Fragment

190
Holland 202, 214, 237, 250, 263
Delhi

246

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

THINGS THAT SHOULD BE

KNOWN.
The Dargle, Wicklow Scenery, and
Wicklow Gold

74
A Sketch of the Wicklow Gold
Mines

75
Torture in India

20
The Gift of Second Sight

36
Second Hand, Second Sight

159
Moore's Imitation of Ossian

109
Shelly in Ireland

178
Government and Taxes

175
Taxes

234
England; Her State Craft and How
to Foil it

236
Irish Inscriptions in Ancient Gaul 249
Torture

266
The Word Celt

287
The English Viceroy in 1745 and in
1857

326
Original Fable

351

PRECEPTS AND EXAMPLES.

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]

"THE WISE MAN GATHERETH KNOWLEDGE, AND RULETI HIS OWN

HOUSE."-Old Celtic Proverb.

No. 1., Vol. I.]

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 1857.

[ONE PENNY.

THE MAP OF OUR JOURNEY.

A committee of the Celtic Union have this day, entered upon a seriously responsible mission, and taken upon their shoulders a truly onerous duty. And though that mission and its duties be to some of them a “labour of love,” with others a pleasurable pastime; yet all feel the seriousness of their position in relation to the work before them, the country for whom that work has been undertaken, and the chances which may bring failure to annihilate, or success to crown their ardent and honest hopes.

And let not those hopes be misunderstood. They are not boyhood's hopes for fame, or manhood's hopes of gain. What they really are time may develope, but this we will say for ourselves,—We write without pay. The success of the Celt can bring us no pecuniary reward: and whatever we may lose by its failure, if it do fail, shall be small in comparison to the loss of the glorious hope we have alluded to.

Our mission will carry us into various departments, and amongst most dissimilar classes, it will entail a great variety of pursuits, and the collecting together of materials apparently incongruous and unsuited to each other. Yet, nevertheless, there shall be an end and an aim in all this, and we shall toil on to the goal.

The Celt will supply matter for the educated, as well as for classes having fewer acquirements; hence there may, at times, appear to be an inequality in the tone, and a want of keeping in the material of its pages. The intention of its editors is, that every page, every article, every extract, shall all tend to a definite end, the common good of our common country, to make Irishmen love Ireland better, cling to their old faith closer, value truth, virtue, honor, more and more venerating the past, acquiring knowledge and power into the future, burying old feuds and animosities in oblivion, and substituting in their place brotherly love and manly union. Great difficulties hang around such a work as this. We may

be misconstrued, misunderstood, laughed at or reviled; bitter antagonisms may be stirred up against us, and men interested in obstructing may plant barriers before us. Secure in conscious integrity of purpose, we will not be deterred from the work we have marked out as fitting for us to do.

In some matters we may have to dissent from the opinions of great men and valued friends, but where we conceive we are right, we shall not hesitate to dissent and to press our own views upon our readers.

For example ; while we admit as a fact indisputable, that Ireland is progressing in wealth and in knowledge, we deny that the progress so making is an evidence of real public prosperity, or truly valuable education.

The present appearance of comfort and wealth in the country is the result of that previous condition which has driven a million of our people into exile, and another million into premature graves; graves that should be marked with blood-red crosses.

A fourth of the whole nation has passed away, the three-fourths who remain have more to do, and therefore more to eat. Further, it is an enrichment arising from the concentration of the property of the many within the hands of the few. The cottiers are dead, or driven out, the graziers who now occupy huge farms are well to do and look prosperous.

The household living upon a scanty income can be maintained all the better in clothing and food, when the grave has closed over half its children; the survivors have as it were a double income. Such prosperity is a sham, the veriest make-believe.

Our own sweet poet of the Shannon, nearly a hundred years gone by, sang of such prosperity.

“ Ill fares the land to hastening ills a prey,

Where wealth accumulates and men decay." Were it possible to try this mock prosperity by the test of bringing up the population of the country to its mark in 1845, would the present position of the property of the country bear it? Assuredly no ; and as population increases, the seeming wealth of the country will

« PreviousContinue »