The public life of the ... earl of Beaconsfield, Volume 2

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Page 12 - Arranged to meet the requirements of the Syllabus of the Science and Art Department of the Committee of Council on Education, South Kensington.
Page 311 - In a progressive country change is constant; and the great question is, not whether you should resist change which is inevitable, but whether that change should be carried out in deference to the manners, the customs, the laws, the traditions of the people, or in deference to abstract principles and arbitrary and general doctrines.
Page 5 - Assaying : As applied to the Manufacture of Iron from its Ores, and to Cast Iron, Wrought Iron, and Steel, as found in Commerce.
Page 22 - Messrs. CHAPMAN & HALL trust that by this Edition they will be enabled to place the works of the most popular British Author of the present day in the hands of all English readers.
Page 452 - Ministers have harassed every trade, worried every profession, and assailed or menaced every class, institution, and species of property in the country.
Page 290 - That it be an instruction to the committee that they have power to alter the law of rating ; and to provide that in every parliamentary borough the occupiers of tenements below a given ratable value be relieved from liability to personal rating...
Page 304 - I think England is safe in the race of men who inhabit her; that she is safe in something much more precious than her accumulated capital — her accumulated experience ; she is safe in her national character, in her fame, in the tradition of a thousand years, and in that glorious future which I believe awaits her.
Page 427 - Her Majesty's new Ministers proceeded in their career like a body of men under the influence of some delirious drug. Not satiated with the spoliation and anarchy of Ireland, they began to attack every institution and every interest, every class and calling in the country.
Page 28 - ANALYSIS OF ORNAMENT: THE CHARACTERISTICS OF STYLES. An Introduction to the Study of the History of Ornamental Art. With many Illustrations.
Page 297 - Who but must laugh if such a man there be ? Who would not weep if Atticus were he?

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