The Major Works

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2003 - English literature - 967 pages
This authoritative edition was originally published in the acclaimed Oxford Authors series under the general editorship of Frank Kermode. It brings together a unique combination of Dryden's poetry and prose - all the major poems in full, literary criticism, and translations - to give theessence of his work and thinking.John Dryden (1631-1700) was the leading writer of his day and a major cultural spokesman following the restoration of Charles II in 1660. His work includes political poems, satire, religious apologias, translations, critical essays and plays. This anthology includes all the major poems such asMacFlecknoe and Absalom and Achitophel as well as Dryden's classical translations; his versions of Homer, Horace, and Ovid are reproduced in full. There are also substantial selections from Dryden's Virgil, Juvenal, and other classical writers. Fables, Ancient and Modern, taken from Chaucer, Ovid,Boccaccio, and Homer, his last and possibly greatest work, also appears in full.
 

Contents

To John Hoddesdon on his Divine Epigrams
1
Astraea Redux
9
To His Sacred Majesty
17
Annus Mirabilis
23
An Essay of Dramatic Poesy
70
Prologues to Secret Love
130
Prologue to The First Part of The Conquest of Granada
137
MacFlecknoe
143
The Sixth Satire of Juvenal
336
The Tenth Satire of Juvenal
359
The First Satire of Persius
373
Ovids Amours Book I Elegy I
409
The Fable of Iphis and Ianthe
434
A Song to a Fair Young Lady
446
To Sir Godfrey Kneller
457
Postscript to the Reader appended to the Aeneid
541

Prologue to Oedipus
154
Canace to Macareus
165
Prologue to The Spanish Friar
174
From the Second Part of Absalom and Achitophel
204
Prologue to the Duchess on her Return from Scotland
217
Ovids Elegies Book II The Nineteenth Elegy
239
Nisus and Euryalus
259
Daphnis
291
A New Song
297
To Anne Killigrew
310
A Panegyric Poem
323
The Secular Masque
854
Notes
861
122222
862
70
870
130
876
154
882
205
888
Further Reading
947
Index of Titles and First Lines
961
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Born August 9, 1631 into a wealthy Puritan family, John Dryden received an excellent education at Westminster School and Cambridge University. After a brief period in government, he turned his attention almost entirely to writing. Dryden was one of the first English writers to make his living strictly by writing, but this meant he had to cater to popular taste. His long career was astonishingly varied, and he turned his exceptional talents to almost all literary forms. Dryden dominated the entire Restoration period as a poet, playwright, and all-round man of letters. He was the third poet laureate of England. In his old age Dryden was virtually a literary "dictator" in England, with an immense influence on eighteenth-century poetry. His verse form and his brilliant satires became models for other poets, but they could rarely equal his standard. Dryden was also a master of "occasional" poetry - verse written for a specific person or special occasion. Like most poets of his time, Dryden saw poetry as a way of expressing ideas rather than emotions, which makes his poetry seem cool and impersonal to some modern readers. Dryden also wrote numerous plays that helped him make him one of the leading figures in the Restoration theatre. Today, however he is admired more for his influence on other writers than for his own works. He died on April 30, 1700 in London.

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