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and better Securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject; and that all Papists, and Per.

fons Marrying Papists, shall be excluded from

and for ever incapable to Inherit, Poffers or ( Enjoy the Imperial Crown of Great Britain,

and the Dominions thereunto belonging, or 'any part thereof; and in every such Case the Crown and Government shall from time to

time descend to, and be enjoy'd by such Perfon being a Protestant as should have laherited and enjoyed the same, in case such Papist, ' or Person Marrying a Papist, was naturally • Dead, according to the Provision for the De• scent of the Crown of England, made by a"nother A&t of Parliament in England, in the ' first Year of the Reign of their late Maje• flies King William and Queen Mary, Entitled, An A&t declaring the Rights and Liberties of 'the Subject, and settling the Succelion of the 6 Crown.

But this point is of so great Consequence, that I must beg leave to repeat the History and Progress of it, which was thus.

Her Majelty was impower'd by two several A&s of Parliament, one of the late Kingdom of England, and the other of the late Kingdom of Scotland, to appoint Commissioners for each Kingdom, to treat of an Union of the two Kingdoms; but it was expresly provided in each A&, that the Commissioners should not treat of, or concerning the Alteration of the WorTip, Discipline, or Government of the Church in either Kingdom.

The Commifsioners were accordingly appointed by her Majesty, and 25 Articles were agreed upon between them, which Articles

were

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I S. were approved, and ratified by two fereral A&ts of Parliament of the said late Kingdoms of England and Scotland; in which faid Ads each Kingdom provided for the Preservation of the Worship, Discipline and Government of its respe&ive Church, within their respective parts of ihe United Kingdom of Great Britain, and each AA of Parliament for the Preservation of the said Churches, were agreed to be taken as a Fundamental Condition of the Union; and to be repeated, and inserted in any Ad of Parliament for agreeing the said Treaty, or Union betwixt the two Kingdoms. And it was exprefly enacted in each of the said Acts, That the faid Articles and Acts hould be and continue in all time coming the fure and perpetual Foundation of a compleat and entire Union of the two Kingdoms of England and Scotland.

After which an Act of Parliament of the U. nited Kingdom of Great Britain was paffed, Entitled, An A&t for an Union of the two King doms of England and Scotland ; wherein reciting the faid 25 Articles of the Union, ratified and confirmed by the respective Aes of Parliament of the Kingdomss of England and Scotland, and inserting the said Ads of Parliament for preserving the Worship, Discipline and Govern. ment of the respective Churches of each King. dom: It is thereby enacted, That the said Acts of Parliament of England and Scotland, for securing their respective Churches; and the said Articles of Union, foas aforesaid ratified, approved and confirmed, be, and continue in alltimes coming, the compleat and entire Union of the two Kingdoms of England and Scotlanı...

The Words, so as aforesaid ratified, approved and confirmed, are very material, and ought to

be

be carefully observed, because some of the said Articles are inade Entire and Absolute ; and others give a Power to the Parliament of Great Britain to alter the same: So that these Words, So as aforesaid ratified, approved and confirmed, must be taken reddendo fingula fingulis, that is, such of the said Articles as express no Power to the Parliament of Great Britair to alter them, snall remain entire ; and such as carry a Power of Alteration by the Parliament of Great Britain are not so Sacred,

Amongst the Articles that carry no such express Power with them, is the second Article for set. tling the Succeffion of the Crown of Great Britain on the House of Hanover ; so that I humbly offer it to every good Subje&t's Con, fideration, Whether this Article is not as firm as the Union it self, and as the Settlement of Episcopacy in England, and Presbytery in Scape land.

There were the sacred Terms and Stipulations made between the two late Kingdoms of England and Scotland, and upon which both Kingdoms, by the Legal Representatives, consented to be dissolved and exist no longer, but be resolved into, and United in one Kingdom, by the Name of Great Britain. .

The Powers that made this happy Union, the Parliaments of England and Scotland, have no longer a Being; and therefore that Union, in the express Terms thereof, must remain Inviolable, The Union would be infringed fhould there be any Deviation from these Articles; and what Consequences that would have no good Subject can think of without Horrour; for as, I humbly presume, there is no possibility of returning into the same State as we were in before this Union, it is wild and extravagant to suppose it can be peaceably broken. Two Warlike Nations that should separate, after being 'under solemn Obligations of perpetual Union, would, like two private Men of Spirit that had broken Friendship, have ten thousand nameless and inexplicable Causes of Anger boiling in their Bofomes, which would render them incapable of living quiet Neighbours, and one of them must be brought very low, or neither of them could live in Peace or Safety. What I mean is, that common Sense, and the Nature of things would make one expe&t that nothing less than a Wac could attend the Disfatisfa&ions of such a Rup. ture. It becomes the Englismen in Generosity to be more particularly careful in preserving this Union.

For the late Kingdom of Scotland had as nu. merous a Nobility as England, and the Representatives of their Commons were also very Numerous; they have by the Articles of Union Consented to send only Sixteen Peers, and 45 Commons, to the Parliament of Great Britain, which hath the same number of Lords and Com. mons for England that were before the Union ; so that the Scots Representatives can make no Stand in the Defence of all, or any of the Articles of the Union, Mould they be Oppos'd by such unequal Numbers of the Lords and Com. mons of England; and therefore it is most plain, from the Impotence in which so many Wiseand able Men of the Scotch Nation left themselves in there particulars, that they understood the Points of Religion in England and Scotland refpe&ively, the Succession to the Crown of Great Britain,

· and

and all other Articles of the Union, were never to be controverted,

To guard and protect this Settlement of the Crown of ihe united Kingdom of Great Britain in the Protestant Line, an A&t of Parliament of the United Kingdom passed in the 6th Year of her Majesty's Reign, Entituled, An A& for the Security of her Majesty's Person and Government, and of the Succellion to the Crown of Great Britain in the Protestant Line, by which the Provifions in the beforementioned A&t(Entitled, An A&t for the better Security of her Majesty's Person and Government, and of the Succellion to Crown of England in the Protestant Line) are extended throughout the whole United King. dom. It is in effect a Repetition of that Act, with proper Alterations for that purpose. . So that now throughout Breat Britain this A& . hath made it high Treason for any Perton maslicioutly, advisódly, and dire@ly, by Writing oor Printing, to maintain and affirm, that

our Sovereign Lady the Queen, that now is, o is not the Lawful and Rightful Queen of these • Realms; or that the Pretended Prince of Wales, ! who now ftiles himself King of Great Britain, oor King of England by the Name of James the Illd, or King of Scotland by the Name of

Fames the Villih, hath any Right or Title to • The Crown of these Realms; or that any other

Person or Persons hath or have any Right or .6 Title to the same, otherwise than according to can A& of Parliament made in England, in the

first Year of the Reign of their late Majesties • King William and Queen Mury, Entitled, An A& declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject, and Jettling the Succession of the Crown,

and

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