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J|HE thrush derives its name from mistletoe herries, of which it is exceedingly fond. It is famed for its clear, ringing, musical note, and sings loudest, and sweetest, and longest in storms; hence it is no mean teacher to man, whose song of gladness and gratitude should rise to heaven—not only when his sky is clear, but when it is darkened with clouds, and the storm portends fearful disasters.

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** He clasps the crag with hooked hands.*'

THE EAGLE.

clasps the crag with hooked hands; The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;

Close to the sun in lonely lands, He watches from his mountain walls,

Kinged with the azure world, he stands. And like a thunderbolt he falls.

Alfred Tennyson.

ra—si

?HAT a desolate place would be this world without a flower! It would bo a 3 face without a smile, — a feast with&ut a welcome! Arc not flowers the etars of the earth? and are not our stars the flowers of heaven?

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Nature is like an iEoIian harp, a musical instrument whose tones are the re-echo of higher strings within us.

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