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REFLECTIONS IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY.

|HEN I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow. When I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when T consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind. When I read the several dates of the tombs, of some that died yesterday, and some six hundred years ago, I consider that great day when we shall all of us be contemporaries, and make our appearance together.

Josefh Addison.

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IjHERE the owner of the house is bountiful, it is not for the steward to be *^ niggardly.

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Not for the milk-white lilies

That lean from the fragrant ledge, Coquetting all day with the sunbeams,

And stealing their goldeu edge; ifot for the vines on the upland.

Where the bright red berries rest,
Nor the pinks, nor the pale sweet cowslip,

It seemeth to me the best.

I once had a little brother.

With eyes that were dark and deep;
In the lap of that old dim forest

He lieth in peace asleep:
Light as the down of the thistle,

Free as the winds that blow,
We roved there the beautiful summers,

The summers of long ago;
But his feet on the hills grew wear)',

And one of the autumn eves,
I made for my little brother

A bed of the yellow leaves. Sweetly his pale arms folded

My neck in a meek embrace,

av9

THE DIVINITY OF POETRY.

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•ETRY is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds. We are aware of evanescent visitations of thought and feeling, sometimes associated with place or person, sometimes regarding our own mind alone, and always arising unforeseen and departing unbidden, but elevating and delightful

beyond all expression; so that, even in the desire and the regret they leave, there cannot but be pleasure, participating as it does in the nature of its object. It is, as it were, the interpenetration of a diviner nature through our own; but its footsteps are like those of a wind over the sea, which the morning calm erases, and whose traces remain only, as on the wrinkled sand which paves it. These and corresponding conditions of being are experienced principally by those of the most delicate sensibility and the most enlarged imagination; and the state of mind produced by them is at war with every base desire. The enthusiasm of virtue, love, patriotism, and friendship, is essentially linked with such emotions; and whilst they last, self appears as what it is, an atom to a universe. Poets are not only subject to these experiences as spirits of the most refined organization, but they can color all that they combine with the evanescent hues of this ethereal world; a word, a trait in the representation of a scene or passion, will touch the enchanted chord, and reanimate, in those who have ever experienced those emotions, the sleeping, the cold, the buried image of the past. Poetry thus makes immortal all that is best and most beautiful in the world; it arrests the vanishing apparitions which haunt the interlunations of life, and veiling them, or in language or in form, sends them for^h among mankind, bearing sweet news of kindred joy to those with whom their sisters abide—abide, because there is no portal of expressions from the caverns of the spirit which they inhabit into the universe of things. Poetry redeems from decay the visitations of the divinity in man. Percy Bysshe Shelley.

As the light of immortal beauty

Silently covered his face;
And when the arrows of sunset

Lodged in the tree-tops bright.
Tie fell, in his saint-like beauty,
Asleep by the gates of light.

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"Light as the down of the thistle, Free as the winds that blow."

Therefore of all the pictures

That hang on Memory's wall,
The one of the dim old forest
Seemeth the best of all.

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