Page images
PDF
EPUB

OF

THE TRADE IN TIN;

A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF TIN MINING

AND METALLURGY;

A HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN AND PROGRESS

OF THE TIN-PLATE TRADE.

AND

A DESCRIPTION OF THE ANCIENT AND MODERN PROCESSES OF

MANUFACTURING TIN-PLATES.

BY PHILIP WILLIAM FLOWER.

- Effodiuntur opes irritamenta malorum."

With Yllustrations.

LONDON:

GEORGE BELL AND SONS, YORK STREET,

COVENT GARDEN.

1880.

[The Right of Translation is reserved.)

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,

STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.

AKQ 1639

15360 S 2 :

MLS .F66

In Memory of my Father,

TO WHOSE EXAMPLE AND INSTRUCTION

I OWE

A TASTE FOR ENQUIRY AND A DESIRE FOR KNOWLEDGE WHICH HAVE

FURNISHED ME WITH AGREEABLE OCCUPATION

DURING THE

INTERVALS OF MY BUSINESS.

-

INTRODUCTION.

The earliest, or at all events one of the earliest requirements of imperfect human nature was obviously a knife, a tool, or a weapon of some sort for the purpose of self-protection, and for the assistance of the owner in obtaining and preparing such food as he consumed.

This want in the first instance was supplied by the use of stone or flint implements now called “celts," which are to be found in almost endless variety, but doubtless their shapes were adapted to the various purposes for which they were required.

Stones in their natural form were first employed, then they were roughly chipped into the shapes of wedges and scrapers, and, later, specimens are found polished and finished with judgment and care; indeed, very beautifully made stone implements are still in use among the Polynesian islanders.

The era in which these stone implements were employed dates beyond the records of man, but that there was a “stone age” is proved beyond a doubt by the existing collections of such implements, which have been obtained from almost every portion of the globe.

Geology demonstrates that this period of barbarism may have extended over tens of thousands of years. Civilization certainly only dates from the discovery of “ fire and metals;' the first use of metals was the starting point of progress.

Greek mythology tells us that Prometheus stole the fire from heaven, but no one has been good enough to inform us who it was that first discovered the existence of tin in Cornwall.

« PreviousContinue »