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being taken prisoners, lost all their effects, with some portion also of their respective notes; but, providentially, what one was deprived of, the other was enabled, to a considerable extent; to preserve; so that, between the two, the joint narrative is nearly complete. From the point, then, where Mr Park first embarked, in 1805, this noble river has now been traced above two thousand miles, in the very heart of Africa; and, in Mr Lander's opinion, it is navigable for a great portion of the distance by small steam-boats. The natives, also, in the interior, are eager to see more of us ; and they are even already so far advanced in civilisation as to make a trade with them worthy of pursuit. The greatest obstacles are the still existing slave-trade near the mouth of the river, and the hostile feelings which our attempts to put an end to it have excited in the deluded population there. Palm oil is, as yet, the only other equivalent for their supplies which they have been able to produce; and they naturally look forward with extreme dislike to the prospect of the market for their other and more valuable object of barter being still further curtailed. They are, in a word, the antimachinists of the African world, and do not like to see the demand contract for manual labour. Mutato nomine, de nobis ipsis fabula narratur."

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[We have given the above extract from the Literary Gazette, containing a sketch by Mr Barrow of the discoveries of the Brothers Lander, as it exhibits, in a striking light, the extraordinary sagacity of our able correspondent. It is well known to all who have taken an interest in the attempt made to ascertain the geography of Northern Africa, that for many years Mr Macqueen has striven strenuously, in opposition to Mr Barrow in the Quarterly Review, and others, to prove that the Niger terminated in the Atlantic Ocean, in the Bight of Benin and Biafra. The question is set at rest by the grand achievement of these intrepid men; and we do not doubt that Mr Barrow will take the first opportunity of doing ample justice to the great knowledge and powers of reasoning exhibited by Mr Macqueen in his numerous writings on this controversy. One of the numerous mouths of the Niger should certainly be called the Macqueen."

C. N.]

Printei by Butantyne and Company, Paul's W.7., Edinburgh

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CLXXXIII.

AUGUST, 1831.

PART I.

Contents.

UNIMORE. A DREAM OF THE HIGHLANDS. BY PROFESSOR WILSON

VISION FIRST.

MORVEN,

SECOND. THE NAIAD,

THIRD. THE LADY OF THE CASTLE,

FOURTH. THE SISTERS,
FIFTH. THE ORATORY,

SIXTH. THE SEER,

THOLOGY.

VOL. XXX.

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SEVENTH. THE DEMON,

EIGHTH. THE CONFESSION,
NINTH.

EXPIATION,

TENTH.

RETRIBUTION,

SOME PASSAGes in the Life of Sir FrizZLE PUMPKIN. CONCLUDED,

LA PETITE MADELAINE,

PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND CO. EDINBURGH.

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HOMER'S HYMN's. No. II. THE BALLAD OF BACCHUS,

MODERN FRENCH HISTORIANS. No. I. SALVANDY'S POLAND,
THE EGLANTINE. BY DELTA,

AUDUBON'S ORNITHOLOGICAL BIOGRAPHY-WILSON'S AMERICAN ORNI-
SECOND SURVEY,

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EDINBURGH:

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD, NO. 45, george street, edINBURGH;

AND T. CADELL, STRAND, LONDON.

To whom Communications (post paid) may be addressed.

SOLD ALSO BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.

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MORVEN and Morn and Spring and Solitude!
As yet it is scarce sunrise, but the sun
Sends dawn before him, while his dazzling disk
Is soaring from the sea, a gentle light,
Tender and delicate exceedingly,
'Neath which, as if it were a glittering veil,
Lies the new-woke and undisturbed earth,
Conscious once more of the sweet hour of Prime.

No object in creation now looks dead.

Stones, rocks, knolls, heather, broom, and furze and fern
Have all a lifelike semblance in the hush,

So strong is the expression of their joy;

Alive appears each solitary tree,

Half-tree, half-shrub, birch with its silver stem,

VOL. XXX. NO. CLXXXIII.

VOL. XXX.

And hazel azure-hued; with feeling smiles,

The feeling of its own fresh loveliness,

That budding brake; and these wild briers enwreath'd

With honey-suckles wild, brimful of life,
Now trail along, and clamber up and fill
The air with odours, by short-sleeping bee
Already visited; though not a bird
Within the nested foliage more than stirs,
Or twitters o'er the blissful wilderness.
Life breathes intenser beauty o'er the flowers.
There within one small round of greensward set
Dew-diamonded daisies, happy all,

In their own sweetness and simplicity;
With lustre burnishing yon mossy nook
An inexhaustible hoard of primroses,
Heap'd up by spring for the delight of morn,
Miser at once and prodigal; here steep'd,
And striped and starred in colours manifold,
Mosses that 'twould be sin to tread upon;
And lo! the white mist lying like a dream,
Motionless almost, yet the while ascending
With gradual revelation of the desert

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Brightly and balmily swimming far and wide,
And yet the spirit of its character
Varying not altering, as the circle spreads
Serener and more spacious ;-Like the Land
Where old songs say the Silent People dwell,
And aye one Creature with a Christian name
Attends the Fairy Queen, by her beloved
O’er all Elves else, though spite of all that love,
Oft is her seven years' sojourn dimm'd with tears
Shed for their sake who, since the fatal hour
That saw their daughter spirited away,
Have little done but wander up and down
Wondering and weeping, or upon the brae
Whence she evanished, with their faces plunged
In both their hopeless hands, sit side by side,
Far from all human ken, from morn till night,
And all on through the moonlight stärriness,
Without once knowing that there is a sky.

Morven and Morn and Spring and Solitude !
In front is not the Scene magnificent ?
Through the mist partly broken into fragments
Fleecelike, and partly roll’d voluminous
Higher and higher up what now is seen
To be a range of mountains, blind-faced cliffs
And hoary crags and blasted stumps look out
Strangely, and all as if they were alive,
From midst of that disparting glamoury;
While from yon indistinct and dubious gloom,
Even-now as sable as a mass of night,
Softening and brightening into woodiness
A shadowy slope with loveliest lights bestrewn,
(For see! the Sun is in ascension)
Èmerges an old Forest. Haunt, no doubt,
Of many a silvan shy, thick-spotted Roe,
And Red-deer vagrant from the stony heights
Below the Eagle's eyry; single trees,
Each in itself a grove, at intervals
Gigantic towering o'er a race of giants,
Illustrious in the yellow glow of Morn.
And now the mists from earth are clouds in heaven;
Clouds slowly castellating in a calm
Sublimer than a storm; while brighter breathes
O'er the whole firmament the breadth of blue,
Because of that excessive purity
Of all those hanging snow-white palaces,
A gentle contrast, but with power divine.

Morven and Morn and Spring and Solitude ! A multitudinous sea of mountain-tops ; And lo! th'uneyeable sun flames up the heavens. Broad daylight now through all the winding glens Is flowing riverlike, but with no sound; And there are goings.on of human life In hut and shieling and in woodland-bower, On the green pastures and the yellow sands; And from the high cliff the deer-stalker sees And hears the coble of the fisherman Glancing and clanking, as she scarcely seems To move o'er the still water sleepily, From her stern almost level with the light Letting her long net drop into the sea.

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