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Dotty (examining it critically). How white and DOTTY (shaking her head). spotty!

He 's stung you badly, may be. Say, will it kill you ?

DICKY (stoutly). DICKY (dubiously). I don't know. I s'pose there is I'd rather be hurt awful bad than be a poison in it!

coward-baby. DOTTY (in tears). Oh, dear! Oh, dear! And all for

How's Arabella ? me! Oh, why did I begin it?

Dorty (examining Arabella carefully). She 's all right. DICKY (consolingly). Now, Dotty, darling! don't you Dicky. No stings on hand or footy ?

fret! I'll-0-0-0-0! I'll try to bear it. DOTTY. Oh, no; she's just mussed up a bit; I 'll fix Dotty. Poor Dicky! let me wrap it up (stripping the

her nice and pretty. afghan of the carriage and surveying it criti

(Shakes Arabella out, and re-arranges her in the carriage. cally). Oh dear! I'll have to tear it. Dicky. Let's play the bee was monstrous big and Dicky (putting it back). No, no, your handker.

had a dragon's head on; chief will do.

And you two be the princesses, such as DOTTY (sweetly). I'll kiss it!

they 're always fed on. Dicky. That'll cure it! (Dotty kisses the stung

I'll be the prince who's galloped up, at just the hand).

lucky minute, It don't pain half so badly now; I think I And killed the dragon dead - and left my can endure it.

sword a-sticking in it. DOTTY (wrapping Dicky's hand up in her handker. DOTTY (enthusiastically). chief).

Oh yes. Well, I 'm the Princess, then Oh, what a brave boy, Dicky Dot! You 're

just like the fairy story,– General no longer.

And we 'll live happy all our days, with lots If I'm the Queen, then you be King: you 're

of gold and glory. nobler, sir, and stronger.

Dicky. All right. And, as the dragon's dead, let 's And Arabella,—she shall be the fairy who shall

play there 'd come to meet us lead us

A big procession, with the King and all his To where our golden palace stands, with lords

court to greet us. to serve and feed us.

DOTTY (grasping the doll-carriage). Then let Prince Dicky. But we 've not got our king-clothes on

Dicky lead the way. 't will set the folks a-staring.

DICKY (shouldering the umbrella). Dotty. I think I'd rather see my King his brand Let Princess Dotty follow new ulster wearing.

With Arabella, off of whom the dragon took a DICKY (utterly captivated). Oh, are n't you nice!

swallow. DOTTY (sweetly). And so are you.

Dotty. She's in the chariot - 0, so ill! DICKY (thoughtfully). My papa said, this morning, Dicky, Move on now to the palace. 'T was manlier to rule yourself, than be a

Guns boom, flags wave, because we've all throne adorning.

escaped the dragon's malice. Dotty (puzzled). What did he mean?

Dorty (stopping him and taking his hand). DICKY (still thoughtful). I s'pose he meant a

But, 'fore we go, we ought to thank these coward 's mean — and — sniffy !

friends who've listened to us. Dotty. You're not.

(Both face the audience. DICKY (accusingly). I ran! DOTTY (emphatically). But then — you killed that

what Dicky. If you are pleased, then we are glad; such

good your smiles can do us. buzzer – in a jiffy !

And if, some time, you come to court, just DICKY (confidingly). Well, Dotty, something said

askright here (putting his hand on his heart):

Dotty. We 'll come out quick. “Hm! you 're a pretty fellow,

(Both join hands. A-hiding from a bumble-bee behind a big

Dicky. For Prince and General Dicky Dot.

Dotty. And Princess Dotty Dick.
umbrella;
A general that 's 'fraid to fight will

[Both bow majestically.
fail
unless he's bolder.
If you ’re a 'fraid-cat now, you'll be a 'fraid.

[Curtain.] cat when you 're older."

[If no curtain is used the children can then march off - DICKY, And so I up and killed him dead.

with umbrella, in front, and DOTTY, rolling doll-carriage, following:

THE REAL KING.

By John R. Coryell.

THE lion is called the king of beasts; but after horse seems incredible enough, but it is even all, he is rather a sneaking sort of fellow, and not more wonderful that he can vie in quickness of what we have a right to expect a monarch to be movement with the muscular tiger. He is very strong, and when he must fight, does One of a party of hunters in India left camp one so fiercely ; but as he is not any more powerful evening, intending to shoot one of the peacocks than the tiger, and is not even as good a fighter, which were heard screaming in their discordant he ought to take rank next to that first cousin of way not very far from camp. He knew from exhis.

perience that he might find a tiger in the neighborBut even the tiger is not entitled to the first hood, though up to that time no traces of that place, for he is not by any means the master of the animal had been seen. But the tiger is so fond brute creation. If any animal can be said to hold of peacock that experienced hunters always go that place, it is certainly the elephant. Only, the cautiously to shoot the birds. elephant, not being a flesh-eater, very seldom has In this case the caution was wise, for when near trouble with his comrades of the forests, and conse- the spot where the birds were, the hunter just quently has no reputation as a fighter. And yet saved himself from stumbling on a large tiger, he can fight, even in captivity, as was seen only a which fortunately was so much taken up with stealfew weeks ago, when in the winter quarters of a ing upon the birds that it did not notice the man. menagerie at Philadelphia, - according to the The latter, anticipating some interesting sport, newspapers,- an enraged lion, escaping from his watched the tiger move stealthily through the broken cage, dashed madly upon a great elephant, underbrush and come upon the noisy birds. Whoonly to be instantly crushed to death by the power ever has seen an ordinary cat crouch and spring ful beast which he had dared to attack.

can comprehend what the hunter saw. The spring All animals, indeed, respect the elephant and was unsuccessful, however; and, as is its custom, give him a wide berth. Once in a while, a rhinoc- the tiger, as if ashamed of its failure, was slinking eros will lose his wits and go tearing through the away, when there came the noise of crashing jungle, regardless of consequences, and he might underbrush, and the graceful creature crouched then attack even an elephant. As a rule, the result closely to the ground. is very disastrous to the rhinoceros, which is quite The noise, as the hunter had at once suspected, likely to discover that his horn is no match for the was caused by the approach of a herd of elephants. two shining white tusks of the elephant.

Again he waited silently for further developments. When used by man for hunting the tiger, the The huge creatures made their way straight toward elephant will frequently display the most abject the clearing where the peacocks had been feeding fear, should the tiger suddenly spring up in his on the grain which grew there. At the head of path ; and this fact has led to the belief that the the herd gamboled a baby elephant. Unconscious elephant has a natural fear of the tiger. The of the presence of the tiger, the little creature was truth is, the tamed elephant has been taught to so almost upon it, when the great cat, as if unable bend his will to his human master's that he has to resist the temptation, darted toward it. Like lost his ability to act upon his own impulse, and, magic the whole herd responded to the shrill cry moreover, is so hampered by his crowded how- of the mother, and the leader of the herd charged dah, and his other trappings, that he has not full to the rescue. liberty of action.

The tiger seemed willing to retreat, but that the Stories without number are told by hunters of leader would not permit; and then began a fierce combats witnessed in the jungle between elephants combat, in which the tiger with all its agility strove and other animals, and all go to show the prodig- to take the elephant anywhere but in front. To ious strength and activity of the huge creatures. avoid this, the elephant moved about with astonStrength, of course, the elephant would be ex- ishing celerity, and finally with a quick plunge pected to have, but it is hard to comprehend how caught the tiger under its ponderous foot, and with so ungainly-looking a creature can be so active and one terrible thrust pierced it with its tusks. Is not agile as he really is. That he can outrun a fleet the elephant the real King ?

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BADMINTON.

BY CHARLES LEDYARD NORTON.

LEFT COURT

RIGHT COURT.

10 FEET.

SERVICE LINE.

NET. 15 FEET.

SERVICE LINE.

RIGHT COURT.

LEFT COURT.

10 FEET.

15 FEET

In these wintry months when frost and snow the “server," and the other is the “striker out." have driven tennis-players from their summer The “server” must stand with both feet within his lawns, the game can be played only when large own right-hand court, and strike the shuttlecock so halls are available. There is, however, an excel- that it will, if it reaches the ground, fall within the lent substitute for tennis in Badminton, a game boundaries of the court diagonally opposite. which has been popular for many years in England, If the shuttlecock is sent fairly over, touching and which last winter became quite the fashion in neither net nor posts, and falls to the ground within New York.

the court specified, the “server” scores ace; that

is, fifteen, as explained farther on.
If the shuttlecock touches net or
posts, it is a “fault," and the
“server” must serve again. Two
consecutive “faults” put him
“hand out,” with no score for

either side, and his opponent HALF COURT LINE.

HALF COURT LINE.

serves in turn.

He is “hand-out,” also, if he strikes the shuttlecock more than once ; if he sends it out of bounds; if he touches it with any part of clothing or person, after having

hit it with his racket; or if he fails 10 FEET.

15 FEET.

altogether to send it over the net. DIAGRAM OF A BADMINTON COURT.

These last are more serious than It is, in effect, lawn-tennis with light, feathered mere “faults,” and no second trial is allowed. shuttlecocks instead of balls. A court of the dimen- If the “server” scores, - that is, if his shuttlecock sions indicated in the diagram is the full size, as falls to the ground within the diagonally opposite used for play in the spacious regimental armories court,- he serves again, standing this time in his of New York. It is far larger than is possible for own left court, and so on, changing courts until most private establishments. The parlor or the his opponent scores. garret, however, can be marked off into courts If the "server's” shuttlecock grazes the net or sufficiently large, and nothing can be finer for posts and the other player returns it, the game Badminton than a genuine country barn, with the goes on; and in like manner, if the “striker-out" net suspended between the hay-mows on either side. fails to make a clear return, but the “server” White tape may be pinned down to mark the courts chooses to receive and send it back, the game conon a carpeted floor, and probably no one will object tinues. If the shuttlecock falls on a line, it counts if the chalk line is used in barn or garret.

for the striker. Badminton can be played over a net or a cord. After the shuttlecock is “in play," either The regulation height of the net is five feet six player may aim to send it so that it will fall anyinches at the ends, and five feet in the middle. The where within either of the opposite courts, the only use in giving it any width at all is, that the purpose of each player being to make the return players may be sure that the shuttlecock goes over as difficult as possible for his opponent. The first it instead of under it,-a requirement which may stroke only is limited to the court diagonally opeasily be in doubt where only a line is used. posite.

The game consists in striking the shuttlecock When either player wins his first stroke, the score back and forth over the net, until one of the players is called fifteen for that player. When either wins fails to return it.

his second stroke, his score becomes thirty. When Suppose that the game is to be single,--that is, either wins a third stroke, the score becomes forty, that only two players are to be engaged, - choice and the fourth stroke won scores “game.” of position and opening play should be decided by If both players win three strokes, - scoring forty lot. The one who makes the first stroke is called each,- the score is called deuce, and the next stroke won by either is called advantage for that of white mosquito netting, with a tape run through player. If this same player wins the next stroke one edge, will serve for a net, and a few split shot he wins the game, but if his opponent wins it, pinched in place along the lower selvedge will the score returns to deuce; and so on until one make it hang nicely. Half-a-dozen tassels will do player wins two successive strokes immediately equally well, and will make the whole affair quite following deuce, when the game is scored for that ornamental. player

The power of flight of the shuttlecocks may be A “set” consists of eleven games; therefore, the regulated to suit the size of the court, by making a player who wins six games wins the set; but if both small hole in the center of each end of the cork have won five games the score is called games all, and pushing in shot until the right weight is and the next game won by either player is called secured. It is a good plan to cover the cork advantage game for that player. If the same with thin india-rubber, and a truer Alight is player wins the next game he wins the set, but if secured for it by lacing a thread in and out he loses it, the score returns to games all, and so around the feathers, about an inch and a half on until one player or the other wins two games from the cork, drawing it tight enough to make immediately following the score of games all, upon the feathers perfectly even. which he wins the set.

In three-handed games the single player serves Tennis-players, of course, know all about this in every alternate game, and the partners serve by method of counting, and it is given here merely turns. In four-handed, and so on up to eightfor the benefit of those who wish to play Badminton, handed games, the service is taken alternately, and and are not familiar with tennis.

the partners on the opposing sides adopt a regular Suitable rackets and shuttlecocks may be had order in taking their turns as “servers.” The of any dealer. The nets now furnished are usually scoring for these sets is governed by the same rules tennis nets, and are wider than necessary. A strip as in single-handed games.

IMD

TOTTY'S BANJO.

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