HISTORY OF ENGLAND

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Page 374 - that having been in this session of parliament expelled this house, he was and is incapable of being elected a member to serve in this present parliament.
Page 418 - Parliament is not a congress of Ambassadors from different and hostile interests, which interests each must maintain as an agent and advocate against other agents and advocates, but Parliament is a deliberative Assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole...
Page 418 - But his unbiased opinion, his mature judgment, his enlightened conscience, he ought not to sacrifice to you; to any man, or to any set of men living.
Page 54 - I bent the whole force of my mind to, was the reduction of that corrupt influence, which is itself the perennial spring of all prodigality, and of all disorder ; which loads us, more than millions of debt ; which takes away vigour from our arms, wisdom from our councils, and every shadow of authority and credit from the most venerable parts of our constitution...
Page 424 - That the power of publishing such of its reports, votes, and proceedings as it shall deem necessary or conducive to the public interests is an essential incident to the constitutional functions of parliament, more especially of this house as the representative portion of it.
Page 332 - ... he did not mean to assert that he could form such a legislature as they possessed now; for the nature of man was incapable of reaching such excellence at once: but his great endeavor would be to form some description of legislature which would produce the same results.
Page 462 - LORD, from the evil man ; and preserve me from the wicked man ; 2 Who imagine mischief in their hearts, and stir up strife all the day long. 3 They have sharpened their tongues like a serpent; adder's poison is under their lips.
Page 453 - Opera), the best farce (the Critic — it is only too good for a farce), and the best Address (Monologue on Garrick), and, to crown all, delivered the very best Oration (the famous Begum Speech) ever conceived or heard in this country.
Page 67 - That it is now necessary to declare, that to report any opinion, or pretended opinion of his Majesty upon any bill or other proceeding depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanour, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the Constitution of this country.
Page 214 - such persons as have just claims on the royal beneficence, or who, by their personal services to the Crown, by the performance of duties to the public, or by their useful discoveries in science and attainments in literature and the arts, have merited the gracious consideration of their sovereign, and the gratitude of their country.

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