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any one who could explain it. Has it ever been, or can it be, accounted for? W. CL.

[This curious fact was first recorded by Pepys, who, in his Diary, under the date 31st July, 1665 (vol. iii. p. 60.) writes as follows:

"This evening with Mr. Brisband, speaking of enchantments and spells, I telling him some of my charmes; he told me this of his own knowledge, at Bourdeaux, in France.

"The words were these: -
Voyci un Corps mort.
Royde come un Baston,
Froid comme Martre,
Leger come un Esprit,

Levons te au nom de Jesus Christ.' "He saw four little girls, very young ones, all kneeling each of them, upon one knee; and one begun the first line, whispering in the eare of the next, and the second to the third, and the third to the fourth, and she to the first.

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"Then the first begun the second line, and so round quite through; and putting each one finger only to a boy that lay flat upon his back on the ground, as if he was dead: at the end of the words, they did with their four fingers raise this boy as high as they could reach. And Mr. Brisband, being there, and wondering at it, as also being afraid to see it, for they would have had him to have bore a part in saying the words, in the room of one of the little girls that was so young that they could hardly make her learn to repeat the words, did, for fear there might be some slight used in it by the boy, or that the boy might be light, call the cook of the house, a very lusty fellow, as Sir G. Carteret's cook, who is very big and they did raise him just in the same manner. This is one of the strangest things I ever heard, but he tells it me of his own knowledge, and I do heartily believe it to be true. I inquired of him whether they were Protestant or Catholique girles; and he told me they were Protestant, which made it the more strange to me.

:

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In illustration of this passage LORD BRAYBROOKE adds, at vol. v. p. 245., the following note, which we insert, as it serves to bring before our readers evidence of this, at present, inexplicable fact on the authority of one of the most accomplished philosophers of our day: "The secret is now well known, and is described by Sir David Brewster, in his Natural Magic, p. 256. One of the most remarkable and inexplicable experiments relative to the strength of the human frame is that in which a heavy man is raised up the instant that his own lungs, and those of the persons who raise him, are inflated with air. This experiment was, I believe, first shown in England a few years ago by Major H., who saw it performed in a large party at Venice, under the direction of an officer of the American navy. As Major H. performed it more than once in my presence, I shall describe as nearly as possible the method which he prescribed. The heaviest person in the company lies down upon two chairs, his legs being supported by the one, and his back by the other. Four persons, one at each leg, and one at each shoulder, then try to raise him; and they find his dead weight to be very great, from the difficulty they experience in supporting

him. When he is replaced in the chair, each of the four persons takes hold of the body as before; and the person to be lifted gives two signals, by clapping his hands. At the first signal, he himself, and the four lifters, begin to draw a long full breath; and when the inhalation is completed, or the lungs filled, the second signal is given for raising the person from the chair. To his own surprise, and that of his bearers, he rises with the greatest facility, as if he were no heavier than a feather. On several occasions, I have observed, that when one of the bearers performs his part ill by making the inhalation out of time, the part of the body which he tries to raise is left as it were behind. As you have repeatedly seen this experiment, and performed the part both of the load and of the bearer, you can testify how remarkable the effects appear to all parties, and how complete is the conviction, either that the load has been lightened, or the bearer strengthened, by the prescribed process. At Venice the experiment was performed in a much more imposing manner. The heaviest man in the party was raised and sustained upon the points of the forefingers of six persons. Major H. declared that the experiment would not succeed, if the person lifted were placed upon a board, and the strength of the individuals applied to the board, He conceived it necessary that the bearers should communicate directly with the body to be raised.

"I have not had an opportunity of making any experiments relative to these curious facts: but whether the general effect is an illusion, or the result of known principles, the subject merits a careful investigation."]

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I beg to give you three references as a voucher of the fact. Mr. Cowdrey, the florist, who has large nursery gardens at Edgbaston, near Birmingham, has one specimen, with the history of which he is personally acquainted: no graft of the purple Cytisus has touched this tree. Mr. Holcombe of Valentines, near Ilford, has another specimen; and in my father's plantations at Kingsheath, near Birmingham, there are four trees of purple laburnum grafted on stocks of yellow laburnum; and of these, two have put forth the purple Cytisus in abundance.

Let no one imagine that the purple Cytisus is merely a variety of the purple laburnum. It is, as I have said, specifically distinct. Its flowers do not grow in racemes, as in the two laburnums, but are on short footstalks all along the branch, with a very peculiar and small foliage springing from the same points of the branch. This fact can leave the problem of changes of species into species no longer of doubtful solution. Perhaps this note may lead to others of more scientific research. Surely a series of well-digested experiments would not merely confirm the facts already known, but lead to a rationale of the presumed transmutation. C. MANSFIELD INGLEBY.

Minar Notes.

66

Apuleius on Mesmerism.-I transcribe the folowing passage, which I have just met with in Apuleius, as a very early allusion to Mesmerism : Quin et illud mecum reputo, posse animum humanum, præsertim puerilem et simplicem seu carminum avocamento, sive odorum delenimento, soporari, et ad oblivionem præsentium externari; et paulisper remota corporis memoriâ, redigi ac redire ad naturam suam, quæ est immortalis scilicet et divina: atque ita, veluti quodam sopore, futura rerum præsagire."-Apuleius, Apol. 475. Delph. ed.

RECHABITE.

The Domiciliary Clause. In 1547 a proclamation was issued by Henry VIII., "that all women should not meet together to babble and talk, and that all men should keep their wives in their houses.' ALIQUIS.

19

Transmission of Ancient Usages. To the derivation of certain customs and usages from the East via Gades or Cadiz, as in the case of the address "uncle" in Andalusia and Cornwall, and the clouted cream in Syria and Cornwall, may be added the use, in the same county, of a lock without wards actually now to be seen sculptured on the great temple of Karnac, in Egypt, too plainly to be mistaken. The principle is similar to that in one of Bramah's locks. Mr. Trevelyan some years ago brought this fact to the notice of the Royal Institution. The principle is not easily explained without an engraving. The voyages of Hamilcar

and others to this part of England for tin is in this way remarkably corroborated, independently of that resemblance in domestic implements, and those of personal use, both in ancient and modern times, which may be traced in the antiquities collected in the British Museum. C. REDDING.

Inscription on an Oak Chest.-I copy the following inscription from the lid of an old oak chest, measuring four feet eight inches and a half long, and two feet three inches and a half broad. The words are taken from Isaiah, chap. i. ver. 16, 17.:

"1.5.9.1.

CEASE. TO. DO. EVILL. LEARNE.TO.DO.GOOD SEKE.TO.DO.RIGHT.RELIVE.THE. POORE"

The letters, it may be observed, are formed by brass-headed nails driven into the wood, in exactly the same manner as trunkmakers do at the present day, to ornament their boxes. It is the property of the Coopers' Company, and, from the spirit of the legend, I should say that it was formerly used to hold the documents relating to the various charities of which the Company are trustees. A. W.

Kilburn.

The Raising of Charles I.'s Standard at Nottingham. The frontispiece to Cattermole's Civil War represents a forlorn group of men, women, and children, watching the fixing into the ground of a large flag, which a soldier is seeking to strengthen by stakes driven round the base of the flagstaff. Surely this is not a correct delineation of that event? Rushworth, it is true, says the standard was fixed in an open field at the back side of the castle wall; but the common opinion, that its position was rather the summit of one of the old turrets of the castle, receives confirmation from a source little known to the public, viz. the memoranda of the antiquary, John Aubrey. In a letter sent to him by Sherrington Talbot (of Laycock ?), who was present at the "raising," the writer says that he saw the flag "lying horizontally on the tower; this horizontal position being occasioned by the tempest which, it need hardly be added, cast the standard down almost as soon as erected. J. W.

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Queries.

REMARKABLE EXPERIMENTS.

A living man, lying on a bench, extended as a corpse, can be lifted with ease by the forefingers of two persons standing on each side, provided the lifters and the liftee inhale at the moment the effort is being made. If the liftee do not inhale, he cannot be moved off the bench at all; but the inhalation of the lifters, although not essential, seems to give additional power.

The fact is undeniable. I have never met with

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"The words were these:
Voyci un Corps mort.
Royde come un Baston,
Froid comme Martre,
Leger come un Esprit,

Levons te au nom de Jesus Christ.' "He saw four little girls, very young ones, all kneeling each of them, upon one knee; and one begun the first line, whispering in the eare of the next, and the second to the third, and the third to the fourth, and she to the first.

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"Then the first begun the second line, and so round quite through; and putting each one finger only to a boy that lay flat upon his back on the ground, as if he was dead at the end of the words, they did with their four fingers raise this boy as high as they could reach. And Mr. Brisband, being there, and wondering at it, as also being afraid to see it, for they would have had him to have bore a part in saying the words, in the room of one of the little girls that was so young that they could hardly make her learn to repeat the words, did, for fear there might be some slight used in it by the boy, or that the boy might be light, call the cook of the house, a very lusty fellow, as Sir G. Carteret's cook, who is very big and they did raise him just in the same manner. This is one of the strangest things I ever heard, but he tells it me of his own knowledge, and I do heartily believe it to be true. I inquired of him whether they were Protestant or Catholique girles; and he told me they were Protestant, which made it the more strange to me.

"9

In illustration of this passage LORD BRAYBROOKE adds, at vol. v. p. 245., the following note, which we insert, as it serves to bring before our readers evidence of this, at present, inexplicable fact on the authority of one of the most accomplished philosophers of our day: "The secret is now well known, and is described by Sir David Brewster, in his Natural Magic, p. 256. One of the most remarkable and inexplicable experiments relative to the strength of the human frame is that in which a heavy man is raised up the instant that his own lungs, and those of the persons who raise him, are inflated with air. This experiment was, I believe, first shown in England a few years ago by Major H., who saw it performed in a large party at Venice, under the direction of an officer of the American navy. As Major H. performed it more than once in my presence, I shall describe as nearly as possible the method which he prescribed. The heaviest person in the company lies down upon two chairs, his legs being supported by the one, and his back by the other. Four persons, one at each leg, and one at each shoulder, then try to raise him; and they find his dead weight to be very great, from the difficulty they experience in supporting

hands.

him. When he is replaced in the chair, each of the four persons takes hold of the body as before; and the person to be lifted gives two signals, by clapping his lifters, begin to draw a long full breath; and when the At the first signal, he himself, and the four inhalation is completed, or the lungs filled, the second signal is given for raising the person from the chair. To his own surprise, and that of his bearers, he rises with the greatest facility, as if he were no heavier than a feather. On several occasions, I have observed, that when one of the bearers performs his part ill by making the inhalation out of time, the part of the body which he tries to raise is left as it were behind. As you have repeatedly seen this experiment, and performed the part both of the load and of the bearer, you can testify how remarkable the effects appear to all parties, and how complete is the conviction, either that the load has been lightened, or the bearer strengthened, by the prescribed process. At Venice the experiment was performed in a much more imposing manner. The heaviest man in the party was raised and sustained upon the points of the forefingers of six persons. Major H. declared that the experiment would not succeed, if the person lifted were placed upon a board, and the strength of the individuals applied to the board. He conceived it necessary that the bearers should communicate directly with the body to be raised.

"I have not had an opportunity of making any experiments relative to these curious facts: but whether the general effect is an illusion, or the result of known principles, the subject merits a careful investigation."]

Minor Queries.

De Sanctâ Cruce.-Can you inform me who is the author of a book entitled De Sanctâ Cruce; and what is the size and date? Are there not more than one under that title? I rather think that Gretser the Jesuit wrote such a book, but I have not been able to meet with it among the London booksellers. HUGO.

Etymology of " Aghindle" or " Aghendole ?". This is a small wooden measure containing eight pounds and a half, being the fourth part of the old peck of thirty-four pounds; and its use is now almost obsolete in those parts of Lancashire where it was formerly known. It is alluded to in the Notes of Pott's Discovery of Witches, edited by James Crossley, Esq., for the Chetham Society.

F.R.R.

Pictures of Queen Elizabeth's Tomb.-Fuller, in his account of Queen Elizabeth, Church History, lib. x., says:

"Her corpse was solemnly interred under a fair tomb in Westminster, the lively draught whereof is pictured in most London, and many country churches, every parish being proud of the shadow of her tomb."

Can any of your correspondents point out instances where these are still preserved?

T. STERNBERG.

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Lord Viscount Dover, Colonel of the First Troop of Guards in the Service of James II. in Ireland, 1689-1690.I am engaged in displaying, with genealogical illustrations, the titles and names of the officers of all the regiments of this ex-monarch, having in my possession a full copy of his Army List, classified in regiments, with columnar rolls of their several officers, according to their rank. The importance of publishing these memorials in aid of pedigree searches must be apparent from the fact, that this list comprises members of all the old aristocracy of Ireland up to that day, to the rank and estates of whom the accession of King William introduced more adventurous, but long less respected successors.

In the opening list of colonels the first I encounter is styled as above: now, what was the name and lineage of this Viscount Dover? Henry, Lord Dover, was appointed one of the Commissioners of the Treasury to that king in 1686; and again, in 1688, a short time before his abdication, was especially chosen to advise the queen. In 1689 the "Earl of Dover" was one of those recorded as having fled with the royal exile to France, and afterwards accompanied him to Ireland. On James' arrival there Lord Viscount Dover appears as above, and was a Privy Councillor, but did not sit in the Parliament of Dublin. In July 1689 he was joined in Commission for the Treasury with the Duke of Tyrconnel, Lord Riverston, and Sir Stephen Rice. Norris says (Life of King William, p. 281.) that this Viscount applied in 1690 for a pass out of the country: on which he retired to the Continent. He was afterwards, with his joint commissioners, outlawed.

Now, according to the Peerage Books, the earldom of Dover became extinct on the death, in 1671, of John Cary, the second Earl, son of Henry, the first Earl, without issue male; and I am not aware of any recognised or otherwise mentioned Viscount Dover. JOHN D'ALTON.

48. Summer Hill, Dublin. Lines on Woman's Will. —

"That man's a fool who tries by art and skill,
To stem the torrent of a woman's will,
For if she will, she will, you may depend on't,
And if she won't, she won't, and there's an end on't."

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Can any of your readers inform me the name of Battle of Alfred the Great with the Danes. the place in Hampshire where the memorable encounter of Alfred the Great with the Danes took place, as different historians call it by various names? also in what part of the county it is situate, and (if still existing) its present name? J. S.

Islington.

Old Satchells.-In Lockhart's Life of Scott, vol. i. p. 63., there occurs the following passage:

"He owed much to the influence exerted over his

juvenile mind by the rude but enthusiastic clan-poetry of old Satchells, who describes himself on his title-page Captain Walter Scott, an old souldier and no scholler.'"

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ancestor of Sir Walter's was called old Satchells? Can any of your readers inform me why this Whether, as is most probable, from his residence, some house or hamlet bearing that name, or from some family, should there be any of that surname. What editions have there been of his "true history," &c.? SIGMA. "Pretty Peggy of Derby, O!"-Who was the author of this ballad, and where shall I meet with a copy of it, my copy being imperfect? R. S.

!

“Noose as I was," and "Noose the same," were frequent replies, in my younger days, to inquiries from persons relative to another's state of health; and occasionally I have heard, in answer to a general inquiry of "How do you do?" or, "How do you find yourself?" the reply "Tightish in a noose. Now, this not having been confined to one particular locality, I should be much pleased if any of your correspondents would throw a light on the unde derivatur of the phrase.

"9

W. R.

Surbiton.

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"The face of a Book in vogue, looks indeed with a sowre aspect against the Priesthood only, but intends (if we may turn aside its disguise) a wound and stab to the Revelation that once settled and still upholds it. Nor would it fare so ill, I verily believe, with the characters of Priests either among the Authors or Admirers of that Treatise, if it were not for Tithes and Offerings, the Lands and Revenues, which the Law and Gospel both allow for the support of that Order."-Pp. 24, 25, of A Sermon preached by Rev. Richard Barker, M. A., Fellow of Winchester College, before Jonathan, Lord Bishop of Winchester, Sept. 22, 1707.

What is the book alluded to, and who was the author? F.R.R. [Most probably Matthew Tindal's treatise, The Rights of the Christian Church Asserted, against the Romish and all other Priests who claim an independent Power over it, published in 1706. The work, which is an elaborate attack upon what are commonly called High-Church principles, caused a great commotion. It is related that, to a friend who found Tindal one day engaged upon it, pen in hand, he said that he was writing a book which would make the clergy mad, Replies to it were published by the celebrated William Wotton, Dr. Hickes, and others.]

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