Religion in Japan: Arrows to Heaven and Earth

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P. F. Kornicki, I. J. McMullen
Cambridge University Press, Feb 8, 1996 - History - 315 pages
Peter Francis Kornicki and Ian James McMullen have put together a remarkable collection of essays on different aspects of religion in Japan by an international team of contributors. The essays in this 1996 book cover a wide range of subjects, from the new religions of post-war Japan to beliefs about fox-possession in the Heian period, and from French missionaries in Okinawa in the mid-nineteenth century to the Ainu bear festival in Hokkaido. Other chapters examine the religious life of Minamoto no Yoritomo, the founder of the first shogunate in the late twelfth century, and the role of pilgrimage in Japanese religion. The essays offer fresh insights into the rich religious traditions of Japan, many of which have been previously neglected in the English-language writing on Japan.
 

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Contents

The worship of Confucius in ancient Japan
39
An early anthropologist? Oe no Masafusas1 record of fox spirits
78
a study of Kumano Shugen
121
bakuhan policy towards religions
135
Fr Leturdus early ethnographic
156
Okuni Takamasa and the religion
179
Shinmeiaishinkai and the study of shamanism in contemporary
198
The Ainu iyomande and its evolution
220
the reproduction of the dead in contemporary Japan
250
the Shikoku pilgrimage as a window
267
The sacred power of wrapping
287
Index
305
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