Immediate, Not Gradual Abolition, Or, An Inquiry Into the Shortest, Safest, and Most Effectual Means of Getting Rid of West Indian Slavery

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Hatchard, 1824 - Slavery - 24 pages
 

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Page 12 - ... the subject of Negro Slavery, which has not been met with just the same predictions. No matter what the motion was ; it was always attended with the same predictions in almost the same language. In the year 1787, a very feeble attempt was made to abate the horrors of the Middle Passage — to admit a little more air into the suffocating and pestilent holds of the Slave-ships. The alarm was instantly taken. The cry of the West-Indians, as we have heard it to-night, was the cry of that day. An...
Page 9 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen ; But, seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 22 - Will the inhabitants of this benevolent, this Christian country, now want a stimulant to rouse their best exertions, — to nerve their resolutions against all participation with these human blood-hounds ? Will the British public now want a " spirit stirring" incentive to prohibit, and to interdict, — henceforth, and for ever, — the merchandize of slavery ? Let the produce of slave labour, — henceforth, and for ever, — be regarded as
Page 4 - ... in our West India colonies, is not an abstract question, to be settled between the Government and the Planters - it is a question in which we are all implicated; - we are all guilty (with shame and compunction let us admit the opprobrious truth) of supporting and perpetuating slavery. The West Indian planter and the people of this country, stand in the same moral relation to each other as the thief and the receiver of stolen goods.
Page 7 - ... (not the gradually, but the immediately emancipated slaves) having abused their freedom. On the contrary, it is frequently asserted in the course of the narrative, that the negroes continued to work upon all the plantations as quietly as before emancipation. Through the whole of Clarkson's diligent and candid investigations of the conduct...
Page 10 - It has indeed, been -proposed to mitigate, in some degree, the miseries of his interminable bondage, but the blessings of [emancipation, according to the propositions of the abolitionists in the last session of Parliament, were to be reserved for his posterity alone, — and every idea of immediate emancipation is...
Page 4 - The perpetuation of slavery in our West India colonies, is not an abstract question, to be settled between the Government and the Planters - it is a question in which we are all implicated; - we are all guilty (with shame and compunction let us admit the opprobrious truthI of supporting and perpetuating slavery.
Page 20 - ... you were, therefore, to be considered the holder of that pledge, to which the hopes of half a million of people were linked. And then, fearful of a little unpopularity, and confounded by the dazzling eloquence of the Right Hon. gentleman, you sat still, you held your peace, and were satisfied to see his pledge, in favour of a whole archipelago, reduced to a single island.
Page 12 - Who can calculate the aggravated accumulation of guilt which may be incurred by its active agents, its interested abettors and supporters? Why then, in the name of humanity, of common sense, and common honesty, do we petition Parliament, year after year, for a gradual abolition of this horrid system, — this complication of crime and misery? Why petition Parliament at all, to do that for us, which, were they ever so well disposed...
Page 22 - spirit stirring" incentive to prohibit, and to interdict, — henceforth, and for ever, — the merchandize of slavery ? Let the produce of slave labour, — henceforth, and for ever, — be regarded as " the accursed thing," and refused admission into our houses; — or let us renounce our Christian profession, and disgrace it no longer, by a selfish, cold-hearted indifference which, under such circumstances, would be reproachful to savages. What was the offence which brought down this frightful...

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