Roundabout Papers (from the Cornhill Magazine): To which is Added The Second Funeral of Napolean

Front Cover
Smith, Elder, & Company, 1879 - English fiction - 347 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 187 - Millions of spiritual creatures walk the earth Unseen, both when we wake, and when we sleep. All these with ceaseless praise his works behold Both day and night : how often from the steep Of echoing hill or thicket have we heard Celestial voices to the midnight air, Sole, or responsive each to other's note, Singing their great Creator...
Page 172 - ... born in no very high sphere, was most finished, polished, easy, witty, quiet; and socially, the equal of the most refined Europeans. If Irving's welcome in England was a kind one, was it not also gratefully remembered? If he ate our salt, did he not pay us with a thankful heart? Who can calculate the amount of friendliness and good feeling for our country which this writer's generous and untiring regard for us disseminated in his own? His books are read by millions of his countrymen, whom he...
Page 171 - ALMOST the last words which Sir Walter spoke to Lockhart, his biographer, were, " Be a good man, my dear ! " and with the last flicker of breath on his dying lips, he sighed a farewell to his family, and passed away blessing them. Two men, famous, admired, beloved, have just left us, the Goldsmith and the Gibbon of our...
Page 175 - In his family, gentle, generous, good-humored, affectionate, self-denying; in society, a delightful example of complete gentlemanhood; quite unspoiled by prosperity.; never obsequious to the great (or, worse still, to the base and mean, as some public men are forced to be in...
Page 173 - I had seen many pictures of his house, and read descriptions of it, in both of which it was treated with a not unusual American exaggeration. It was but a pretty little cabin of a place ; the gentleman of the press who took notes of the place, whilst his kind old host was sleeping, might have visited the whole house in a couple of minutes.
Page 171 - His new country (which some people here might be disposed to regard rather superciliously) could send us, as he showed in his own person, a gentleman, who, though himself born in no very high sphere, was most finished, polished, easy, witty, quiet ; and, socially, the equal of the most refined Europeans.
Page 214 - I would like to be able to write a story which should show no egotism whatever — in which there should be no reflections, no cynicism, no vulgarity (and so forth), but an incident in every other page, a villain, a battle, a mystery in every chapter.
Page 286 - Eyre, sent to me by an author whose name and sex were then alike unknown to me ; the strange fascinations of the book ; and how with my own work pressing upon me, I could not, having taken the volumes up, lay them down until they were read through...
Page 177 - Clarissa." " Not read 'Clarissa!'" he cried out. "If you have once thoroughly entered on ' Clarissa ' and are infected by it, you can't leave it. When I was in India I passed one hot season at the hills, and there were the Governor-General, and the Secretary of Government, and the Commander-in-Chief, and their wives. I had
Page 213 - Woman in White : " and these books gave me amusement from morning till sunset. I remember those ague fits with a great deal of pleasure and gratitude. Think of a whole day in bed, and a good novel for a companion ! No cares : no remorse about idleness : no visitors : and the Woman in White or the Chevalier d'Artagnan to tell me stories from dawn to night ! " Please, ma'am, my master's compliments, and can he have the third volume ?" (This message was sent to an astonished friend and neighbour who...

Bibliographic information