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Lucifer.

But by whom or what?
Cain. Show me.
Lucifer. Dar'st thou behold?
Cain.

How know I what
I dare behold? As yet, thou hast shown nought
I dare not gaze on further.
Lucifer.

On, then, with me

DK.

ty to disturb him till 4 mid-day rest is nearly * at least not now: he

CAIN AND ADAP

(CAIN, Act ii. Scen

young inheritor

· his long

er blue
eper smiles,
gör sins unknown,

aves o'er them ;
Yt pluck'd the fruit-
aked ! Must the time

But now sleep on!
va have said well ; I will cord

days when both are cheering

wung: sleep on, and smile! He smiles, and sleeps !-Sie;'

must dream

Adah. Hush! tread softly, Cai,
Cain.

Adah. Our little Enoch sleep
Of leaves, beneath the cypress

Cain.
A gloomy tree, which looks
O'er what it shadows; whe
For our child's canopy ?

Adah.
Shut out the sun liker
Fitting to shadow slu

Cain.
And longest ; but

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Adah
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him, at least not now: he will awake sem
2017 of mid-day rest is nearly over ;
Fete pity to disturb him till

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l'ou have said well ; I will stain

What is that
them die !
well, nor is that thought
as with thee.
might live!

one victim

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to sinwledge ? low, my Cain : thy words

Then leave me !

Never, thee.

Say, what have we here? uitars, which our brother Abel made absence, whereupon to offer to God on thy return. And how knew he, that I would be so ready the burnt offerings, which he daily brings in a meek brow, whose base humility shows more of fear than worship, as a bribe To the Creator ?

Adah. Cain! that proud spirit, who withdrew thee

hence,
Hath sadden'd thine still deeper. I had hoped
The promised wonders which thou hast beheld,
Visions, thou say’st, of past and present worlds,
Would have composed thy mind into the calm
Of a contented knowledge ; but I see
Thy guide hath done thee evil ; still I thank him,
And can forgive him all, that he so soon
Hath given thee back to us.
Cain.

So soon?
Adah.

'Tis scarcely Two hours since ye departed : two long hours To me, but only hours upon the sun.

Cain. And yet I have approach'd that sun, and seen
Worlds which he once shone on, and never more
Shall light; and worlds he never lit : methought
Years had rollid o'er my absence.
Adah.

Hardly hours.
Cain. The mind then hath capacity of time,
And measures it by that which it beholds,
Pleasing or painful ; little or almighty.
I had beheld the immemorial works
Of endless beings; skirr'd extinguish'd worlds ;
And, gazing on eternity, methought
I had borrow'd more by a few drops of ages
From its immensity : but now I feel
My littleness again. Well said the spirit,
That I was nothing !
Adah.

Wherefore said he so?
Jehovah said not that.
Cain.

No: he contents him
With making us the nothing which we are ;
And after Aattering dust with glimpses of
Eden and Immortality, resolves
It back to dust again—for what ?

Adah.

Thou know'st-
Even for our parents' error.
Cain.

What is that
To us ? they sinn'd, then let them die !

Adah. Thou has not spoken well, nor is that thought Thy own, but of the spirit who was with thee. Would I could die for them, so they might live!

Cain. Why, so say I-provided that one victim Might satiate the insatiable of life, And that our little rosy sleeper there Might never taste of death nor human sorrow, Nor hand it down to those who spring from him. Adah. How know we that some such atonement one

day
May not redeem our race?
Cain.

By sacrificing
The harmless for the guilty ? what atonement
Were there? why, we are innocent : what have we
Done, that we must be victims for a deed
Before our birth, or need have victims to
Atone for this mysterious, nameless sin-
If it be such a sin to seek for knowledge ?

Adah. Alas ! thou sinnest now, my Cain : thy words
Sound impious in mine ears.
Cain.

Then leave me ! Adah.

Never, Though thy God left thee. Cain.

Say, what have we here? Adah. Two altars, which our brother Abel made During thine absence, whereupon to offer A sacrifice to God on thy return.

Cain. And how knew he, that I would be so ready With the burnt offerings, which he daily brings With a meek brow, whose base humility Shows more of fear than worship, as a bribe To the Creator ?

a

Adah. Cain ! that proud spirit, who withdrew thee

hence,
Hath sadden'd thine still deeper. I had hoped
The promised wonders which thou hast beheld,
Visions, thou say'st, of past and present worlds,
Would have composed thy mind into the calm
Of a contented knowledge ; but I see
Thy guide hath done thee evil ; still I thank him,
And can forgive him all, that he so soon
Hath given thee back to us.
Cain.

So soon?
Adah.

'Tis scarcely Two hours since ye departed : two long hours To me, but only hours upon the sun.

Cain. And yet I have approach'd that sun, and seen
Worlds which he once shone on, and never more
Shall light; and worlds he never lit : methought
Years had rollid o'er my absence.
Adah.

Hardly hours.
Cain. The mind then hath capacity of time,
And measures it by that which it beholds,
Pleasing or painful ; little or almighty.
I had beheld the immemorial works
Of endless beings ; skirr'd extinguish'd worlds ;
And, gazing on eternity, methought
I had borrow'd more by a few drops of ages
From its immensity : but now I feel
My littleness again. Well said the spirit,
That I was nothing!
Adah.

Wherefore said he so ?
Jehovah said not that.
Cain.

No: he contents him
With making us the nothing which we are ;
And after flattering dust with glimpses of
Eden and Immortality, resolves
It back to dust again—for what ?

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