The World's Great Masterpieces: History, Biography, Science, Philosophy, Poetry, the Drama, Travel, Adventure, Fiction, Etc.

Front Cover
This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2016)

Frank Richard Stockton was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on April 5, 1834. In 1868, he started working for the magazine Hearth and Home, where he wrote fairy tales as well as stories and articles on a variety of subjects for adults. In 1874, he became the assistant editor of Saint Nicholas Magazine and worked there until 1878 when he was forced to resign due to failing eyesight. He continued to write by dictating to his wife or a professional secretary. His first fairy tale, Ting-a-Ling, was published in The Riverside Magazine in 1867 and his first book collection was published in 1870. His works include The Lady or the Tiger, The Griffin and the Minor Canon, The Bee-Man of Orn, The House of Martha, and The Lost Dryad. He died of a cerebral hemorrhage on April 20, 1902 at the age of 68.

Bibliographic information