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So arranged for the Use of Schools, as to form a new and easy

Introduction to Latin and other Classical Grammars,

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED BY

THE REV. HENRY ST. JOHN BULLEN, A.M.,

Late Head-Master of the Grammar School, at Leicester;

Now Edited, with a Preface, a Treatise on the English Articles, on English Prosody, Punc-
tuation, Derivations, and a Chapter on Gerunds and Supines ; with various

corrections and additions ; particularly on the principles of

Spelling, and a fresh construction of the Verbs:

BY THE

REV. CHARLES HEYCOCK, A.M.,

Perpetual Curate of Owston, and Rector of Withcote, in the County of Leicester.

“De verbis enim componendis, et de syllabis propemodum dinumerandis et demetiendis
loquemur: quæ etiamsi sunt, sicuti mihi videtur, necessaria; tamen fiunt magnificentius,
quam docentur."-Cic. Orat, ad Marc. Brut. 43.

“Consuetudo, certissima loquendi magistra, utendumque planè sermone, ut nummo,
cui publica forma est."- Quinetil.

“The profit of Grammar is great to strangers, who are to live in communion and com-
merce with us; and it is honourable to ourselves : for by it we communicate all our labours,
studies, and profits, without an interpreter.-Ben. Jonson.

LONDON:
ARTHUR HALL, VIRTUE & CO., 25, PATERNOSTER ROW.

LEICESTER: T. CHAPMAN BROWNE, BIBLE & CROWN,

MARKET PLACE.

MDCCCLIII.

302.0.47

LEICESTER:

PRINTED BY T CHAPMAN BROWNE BIBLE AND CROWN,

MARKET PLACE.

PREFACE.

MEN who have been accustomed to the more finished Grammars, employed in teaching the ancient Classical Languages; and who have most generally acquired their knowledge of their own through them; have felt great embarrassment, when they have been called upon to teach the English, by means of the Grammars that have hitherto been employed. Their arrangement has appeared so imperfect, that to obviate the inconvenience, many persons have compiled forms of their own; and, in several instances, have been kind enough to submit their productions, however elementary, to the inspection of the public eye. The Editor of the present Grammar, being called to the education of his own family, fell into the same perplexity. The difficulty was, how to make choice of a Grammar, upon which he liked to commence. Some that he procured, were too brief; having rules without examples for their illustration; others were of a didactic kind, leaving to the master the task of verbal instruction and elucidation; others were too abstruse and technical; some came in an Epistolary form; and Mr. Murray's Grammar, which hitherto

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