History and Interpretation in New Testament Perspective

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BRILL, Jan 1, 2001 - Religion - 177 pages
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This book is a sequel to the author's "The Making of the New Testament Documents" (Brill, 1999), placing it within the context of two centuries of research and then expanding its brief treatment of a number of important issues. It critiques the hypothesis of 'innocent' apostolic pseudepigrapha and investigates historical and literary evidence for dating the New Testament books, for Paul's mission to Spain, and for his subsequent composition of the Pastoral epistles. It also gives extended attention to the identity and the roles of Paul's co-workers. With respect to preformed traditions, a major topic of the earlier volume, it devotes special attention to biblical expositions in the teaching of Jesus and in the New Testament generally. In conclusion it draws out the implications of preformed traditions for the origins of Paul's christology.

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Contents

HISTORICALLITERARY CRITICISMAFTER
1
The Necessity and Contribution of Historical
10
PSEUDONYMITY AND CANONICITY OF
17
DATING THE NEW TESTAMENT
31
THE ORIGIN AND COMPOSITION OF
65
PAUL AND HIS COWORKERS REVISITED
83
THE INTERPRETATION OF THE BIBLE
99
HOW JESUS INTERPRETED HIS BIBLE
121
PREFORMED TRADITIONS AND THEIR
133
Indexes of Passages
151
Index of Modern Authors
171
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About the author (2001)

E. Earle Ellis is Research Professor of Theology Emeritus and Scholar in Residence, Southwestern Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas. His previous Brill volumes are "The Making of the New Testament Documents" (1999) and "Christ and the Future in New Testament History" (2000).

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